SPONSORED:

Fox Business host apologizes after analyst says torture 'worked on' McCain

Fox Business Network host Charles Payne apologized on Thursday, after an analyst who appeared on his show said that torture "worked on" Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump knocks CNN for 'completely false' report Gaetz was denied meeting The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden, lawmakers start down a road with infrastructure Sylvester Stallone reportedly joins Trump's Mar-a-Lago MORE (R-Ariz.) during his time as a prisoner of war in Vietnam.

"This morning on a show I was hosting, a guest made a very false and derogatory remark about Senator John McCain. At the time, I had the control room in my ear telling me to wrap the segment, and did not hear the comment," Payne tweeted. 

"I regret I did not catch this remark, as it should have been challenged. As a proud military veteran and son of a Vietnam Vet these words neither reflect my or the network’s feelings about Senator McCain, or his remarkable service and sacrifice to this country."

Payne's apology came after Thomas McInerney, a former Fox News military analyst, rebuked McCain, who urged Senate colleagues on Wednesday to reject the nomination of Gina Haspel, President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to move ahead with billion UAE weapons sale approved by Trump Fox News hires high-profile defense team in Dominion defamation lawsuit Associate indicted in Gaetz scandal cooperating with DOJ: report MORE's pick to lead the CIA. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Haspel has faced criticism from many lawmakers — mostly Democrats — for her ties to a brutal CIA detention and interrogation program in the years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. In her confirmation hearing on Wednesday, Haspel vowed not to reimplement such interrogation techniques, calling the tactics "immoral."

Payne asked McInerney on Thursday whether Congress should evaluate Haspel on her personal feelings or on her stated commitment to avoiding the use of such interrogation techniques, which have widely been condemned as torture.

"Well, she can't use it [torture] anymore because we have determined in Congress that it's not legal. The fact is, is John McCain, it worked on John. That's why they call him 'Songbird John,'" McInerney said, asserting that such tactics are effective.

As a POW in Vietnam, McCain was brutally tortured ultimately leading him to falsely confess to crimes.

Many military officials and analysts argue that torture is an ineffective means of interrogation because it can drive suspects to offer false confessions or inaccurate information.

Trump has insisted that torture works, though Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisBiden's is not a leaky ship of state — not yet Rejoining the Iran nuclear deal would save lives of US troops, diplomats The soft but unmatched power of US foreign exchange programs MORE has argued the contrary and remains firmly against the practice.