Washington Post asks for help identifying Trump's golf partners

The Washington Post is soliciting help from the public to identify some of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE's golf partners on dozens of outings since he entered office.

The Post issued a call Friday seeking tips to identify who might have golfed with Trump on 81 of the 111 days he is believed to have hit the links since becoming president.

Only a few of Trump's golf partners since he has become president are known, a list that includes foreign leaders such as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as well as GOP lawmakers, Fox News personalities and others.

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The Post is asking readers to submit tips regarding specific days during Trump's presidency when he is thought to have golfed with a partner, citing a need for transparency for those whom the president spends hours with in a private setting.

The newspaper cited Trump's propensity to play in private settings away from cameras as a reason why identifying his partners has been so difficult.

"In part this is because Trump chooses to play on courses where he can keep outside observers from seeing what’s going on. That also means that it’s often hard to learn about his partners and, further, to confirm that he was joined on the course," the article reads.

Trump frequently golfs with members of his exclusive clubs in Bedminster, N.J., and Palm Beach, Fla., where his partners are often not released to the public.

The Post noted that a lawsuit last year forced the Trump administration to identify dozens of individuals who visited the club during a visit from Abe.

Earlier this month, the president crashed a wedding being held at his Bedminster club, and has been known to make surprise drop-ins before.

“If he is on-site for your big day, he will likely stop in & congratulate the happy couple. He may take some photos with you but we ask you and your guests to be respectful of his time & privacy,” a discontinued brochure for his New Jersey club obtained by The New York Times read.