North Carolina newspaper cuts comics, citing Trump tariffs on newsprint

North Carolina newspaper cuts comics, citing Trump tariffs on newsprint
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A North Carolina newspaper recently decided to cut its Sunday color comics section, citing the rising cost of newsprint due to President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE’s tariffs.

The Robesonian announced the move in an editorial late last month, saying that the cost of newsprint from Canada had risen about 30 percent since the start of the year, forcing them to make the “difficult decision.”

"This newspaper has made the difficult decision to drop the Sunday comics, a decision that we really believe was made at the White House," the editorial noted.

“Like all newspapers, we have been asked to do more with less, and in recent years we have been nimble in figuring out how best to use our dwindling resources,” it added. “Disappointingly, we could not dance around this decision, which we would like to think is temporary.”

The Robesonian said it dropped the Sunday comics under a previous owner, describing that decision as “more a money grab than a survival strategy.”

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The Trump administration originally placed tariffs of 22 percent on Canadian newsprint after a complaint from a Washington state paper plant earlier this year. Following outcry from local papers and lawmakers and some major newspapers being forced to cut staff members, the administration lowered the cap on the tariffs.

The Robesonian called the tariffs protecting the Washington plant a “decidedly unRepublican approach and contrary to the capitalistic fundamentals that have given us the world’s No. 1 economy and nourishes it.”

The paper called on readers to consider contributing financially to the newspaper through subscriptions and advertising, but said The Robesonian is “a healthy newspaper.”

“For Sunday comics to return, something has to break to our benefit — additional readers and advertisers, or a change of heart at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Of those two, we know which is more likely,” the editorial board wrote.