First black female journalist to cover White House being honored with statue at Newseum

First black female journalist to cover White House being honored with statue at Newseum
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The first African-American female journalist to cover the White House is being honored with a statue that will be displayed at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Alice Allison Dunnigan, who covered the White House while serving as head of the Associated Negro Press' Washington Bureau, died in 1983. She worked for 14 years as the head of the bureau, writing stories for more than 100 African-American newspaper across the country.

A bronze statue being created by Kentucky artist Amanda Matthews will stand 6-feet high, and is modeled on a 1947 photo of Dunnigan holding a copy of The Washington Post while standing outside the Capitol, according to the New York Times.

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“I think we should have more diverse heroes, and Alice Dunnigan should be one of them,” Matthews told the newspaper.

Carrie Christoffersen, curator and vice president of exhibits at the Newseum, called Dunnigan a “barrier breaker.”

“Alice was such a barrier breaker for women and people of color, we were happy to have the opportunity to embrace her here at the museum,” Christoffersen told the Times.

Dunnigan, who was born in 1906 as the daughter of a washerwoman and Kentucky sharecropper, was also the first black woman to receive credentials to cover the State Department, Congress and the Supreme Court.

She was posthumously inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame in 2013, and received dozens of journalism awards while she was alive.

The sculpture honoring Dunnigan will go on display at the Newseum on Sept. 21.