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Trump Jr. tears into Scarborough over 9/11 op-ed: You owe 3,000 plus families an apology

President Trump's eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., tore into MSNBC host Joe Scarborough for writing a column on 9/11 that called the president a greater threat to the U.S. "than any foreign adversary."

Scarborough released the op-ed in The Washington Post on Tuesday - the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks -  calling President Trump a national security risk.

Trump Jr. said it was "disgraceful" for Scarborough to inject politics on the anniversary of the attacks, which killed nearly 3,000 people in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania.

"Joe you owe an apology to the 3000+ families who lost loved ones on this tragic day," he tweeted. "Injecting politics today is disgraceful and only shows how irrelevant and deranged you've become."

Scarborough, a former Republican Party member and lawmaker, criticized Trump's "maniacal moves" in the column. 

"Sixteen years of strategic missteps have been followed by the maniacal moves of a man who has savaged America's vital alliances, provided comfort to hostile foreign powers, attacked our intelligence and military communities, and lent a sympathetic ear to neo-Nazis and white supremacists across the globe," wrote the "Morning Joe" co-host.

"For those of us still believing that Islamic extremists hate America because of the freedoms we guarantee to all people, the gravest threat Trump poses to our national security is the damage done daily to America's image," he continued.

"Osama bin Laden was killed by SEAL Team 6 before he accomplished that goal. Other tyrants who tried to do the same were consigned to the ash heap of history. The question for voters this fall is whether their country will move beyond this troubled chapter in history or whether they will continue supporting a politician who has done more damage to the dream of America than any foreign adversary ever could," Scarborough concluded.

Scarborough sought to walk back some of his comments on Twitter, writing that the words could be read differently on the anniversary. 

"The column was focused on 17 years of strategic missteps," Scarborough tweeted. "The last paragraph became the sole focus of Trump supporters. On every other day of the year, I do not shy away from negative feedback from the right, the left or from Trump supporters."

"On September 11th, I'll read the column again and think about whether I could have said the same thing in a way less offensive to Trump supporters on September 11th," he continued.

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