Woodward: I'll release tapes of book interviews if sources ask me to

Woodward: I'll release tapes of book interviews if sources ask me to
© Getty Images

Veteran reporter and author Bob Woodward said in a recent interview that he would release tapes of the interviews he conducted for his new book for any source who requests it.

The Friday morning interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt is part of Woodward's media tour to promote his book, "Fear: Trump in White House," which saw more than 750,000 copies sold in its first day of release on Tuesday alone.

ADVERTISEMENT

"If you one of your sources, who you have taped, comes forward and publicly asks you to release those tapes, would you do so?" asked Hewitt.

"Yes, I think I would," Woodward replied. "This is meticulously done, trying to cross reference everything and so forth. I would expect somebody would not want to release their information because they're confidential sources and, as you know, I protect my sources. I think it's one of the building blocks of journalism and book writing."

Woodward told CBS on Thursday that he has "boxes of recordings and documents" that proves how careful he was with sourcing in "Fear."

"When somebody looks at this in 20 or 30 or 40 years, boxes of recordings and documents, they will see that this was very carefully done," Woodward told "CBS This Morning."

"I can argue with a straight face that an ardent Trump supporter would read this and have to pause. Because whether you like Trump or don't like Trump, it's a management issue."  

Several top Trump administration officials, including White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisWhy Russia covets hypersonic weapons Talk grows that Trump will fire Dan Coats Graham cursed at acting DOD chief, declaring himself his 'adversary' MORE, former chief economic adviser Gary CohnGary David CohnChristie: Trump doesn’t give nicknames to people he respects On The Money: Congress pivots to prevent another shutdown | Trump hits Venezuelan oil company with sanctions | US criminal charges filed against Huawei | Next round of China trade talks set | Forecasts raise doubt on Trump’s economic goals Gary Cohn joked about sending Trump to help Brexit talks: report MORE, former White House staff secretary Rob Porter and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyNikki Haley slams media for Smollett coverage: 'He played them all for fools' Four names emerge for UN position: report Heather Nauert withdraws her name from consideration for UN ambassador job MORE have all publicly disputed accounts in the book in recent days. 

On Tuesday, Woodward pushed back in an interview with The New York Times, stating a “key” official in the administration privately told him that the book's details are “1,000 percent true,” while publicly dismissing them.