Scarborough: 'If you don't vote next Tuesday, just keep your mouth shut' about Trump

Scarborough: 'If you don't vote next Tuesday, just keep your mouth shut' about Trump
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MSNBC's Joe Scarborough declared on Monday that anyone who doesn't go out and vote in the midterm elections needs to keep their "mouth shut for the next two years" about President Trump. 

"If you don’t vote next Tuesday, just keep your mouth shut for the next two years about the Constitution being insufficient, Madisonian democracy being insufficient to check [Trump]," Scarborough said to "Morning Joe" co-host Mika Brzezinski.

"Because, Mika, the check is in the hands of not you and me, but in the hands of over 300 million people who can go out and vote next Tuesday.”

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Scarborough, a former GOP congressman, left the party in 2017 due to Trump, who was once a frequent guest on the program during his candidacy. Trump's last interview with "Morning Joe" occurred in May 2016 after the candidate and co-hosts had a falling-out.

Brzezinski said she believes the president performed poorly over the past week, which included a man sending explosive devices to several prominent Democratic lawmakers and activists and CNN, and a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 people dead.

"He's engaging in petulant punditry instead of unifying the country," said Brzezinski. "Complaining that the latest horrible news interrupted Republican momentum in the midterms. Really? He's tweeting about baseball, bullpen strategy the very same day of the synagogue slaughter, as if to send a message, as you said, Joe, to his adoring white nationalist fans that the murdering of these worshippers was not even a concern.

"We will survive Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP congressman slams Trump over report that U.S. bombed former anti-ISIS coalition headquarters US to restore 'targeted assistance' to Central American countries after migration deal Trump says lawmakers should censure Schiff MORE, I guess, but once again, he has shown his true self, this time in the face of violence and death, and I am confident that history will judge his performance over the last week harshly," she said. "Voters need to be a part of history and they should do the same."

Republicans currently hold a two-seat majority in the Senate, while Democrats need to net 23 seats to take control of the House.

An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows voter turnout for the midterms could be at its highest level in more than a decade.

Overall, nearly two-thirds, 65 percent, of those surveyed indicated having a high interest in the midterms.

The last election to generate that kind of interest occurred in 2006, when 61 percent said they were highly interested in that midterm elections, which occurred during the presidency of George W. Bush.