Eric Trump: Obama has 'personal problem' with my father

Eric TrumpEric Frederick TrumpTrump family members will join state visit to UK New financial disclosure forms provide glimpses of Trump's wealth De Blasio blasts Trump as he launches 2020 bid: 'Every New Yorker knows he's a con artist' MORE said Tuesday that former President Obama has "a personal problem" with his father, President TrumpDonald John TrumpNASA exec leading moon mission quits weeks after appointment The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan Frustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' MORE.

"He does have a personal problem," Eric Trump told Fox News during their election night coverage. "He's taking credit for a lot of my father's accomplishments."

ADVERTISEMENT

Obama has said that he is responsible for the current economic boom, which began under his presidency. President Trump and other conservatives have disputed that idea, saying economic conditions have improved substantially under GOP rule.

Eric Trump said Tuesday that you "see the passion" at the president's rallies that was missing from Obama's.

He described an incident where someone at one of the president's rallies had a health emergency, prompting the crowd to begin singing "Amazing Grace" as medical professionals helped the attendee.

"It borderline brings tears to your eyes," Trump said. "That's America."

"I mean, people want this country to thrive," he said. "People want this country to succeed, and this country is winning. We are winning."

Obama has been campaigning actively for Democrats in the midterm elections, while President Trump has been out stumping for the GOP. 

Obama said at a rally Sunday that the 2018 midterms "might be the most important election" of his lifetime and "maybe more important than 2008," when he was first elected president.

He repeated his message in a tweet Monday night, adding that the "character of our country is on the ballot."

In Trump's closing arguments, he cast the election as a referendum on him.

"In a sense, I am on the ticket," the president said Monday.

Like Obama, he framed it as a stark choice, saying that "a vote for Republicans is a vote to continue our extraordinary prosperity” and that voting for Democrats would bring “a socialist nightmare for our country.”