Carlson on activists at his house: It wasn't a protest, it was a threat

Carlson on activists at his house: It wasn't a protest, it was a threat
© Fox News

Fox News' Tucker Carlson says that the mob that gathered outside his home Wednesday night was not a protest but a threat.

Carlson told The Washington Post in an interview published Thursday that he received multiple text messages telling him there was a commotion outside his home on Wednesday, prompting him to call his wife, who was home.

"She had been in the kitchen alone getting ready to go to dinner and she heard pounding on the front door and screaming," he said. "Someone started throwing himself against the front door and actually cracked the front door."

Carlson said that his wife thought it was a home invasion and locked herself in the pantry and called the police.

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"It wasn't a protest. It was a threat," Carlson told the Post. "They weren’t protesting anything specific that I had said."

"They weren’t asking me to change anything," he said. "They weren’t protesting a policy or advocating for legislation."

"They were threatening me and my family and telling me to leave my own neighborhood in the city that I grew up in."

The mob, associated with left-wing antifa activists, converged on his house Wednesday night reportedly yelling, "Racist scumbag, leave town!"

A Twitter account affiliated with Smash Racism DC posted video of what it said was activists protesting Carlson.

"Tucker Carlson, we will fight! We know where you sleep at night!" it tweeted.

"Every night you spread fear into our homes—fear of the other, fear of us, and fear of them," another of Smash Racism DC's tweets read. "Each night you tell us we are not safe. Tonight you’re reminded that we have a voice."

"Tonight, we remind you that you are not safe either."

All of the tweets have since been taken down. 

Fox News CEO Suzanne Scott and President Jay Wallace condemned the incident Thursday.

"The incident that took place at Tucker’s home last night was reprehensible," they wrote in a joint statement sent to The Hill. "The violent threats and intimidation tactics toward him and his family are completely unacceptable."

"We as a nation have become far too intolerant of different points of view," they added. "Recent events across our country clearly highlight the need for a more civil, respectful, and inclusive national conversation."

"Those of us in the media and in politics bear a special obligation to all Americans, to find common ground."