Conservative pastor: ‘The floor of Congress is now going to look like an Islamic republic’

Conservative pastor commentator E.W. Jackson went on an anti-Islamic tirade on his radio show Wednesday, complaining that Muslims are taking over Congress.

Jackson's remarks were in response to reports that Democrats are attempting to change a rule banning headwear on the floor of the House to accommodate incoming Muslim lawmakers such as Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week Omar reflects on personal experiences with hate in making case for new envoy MORE, who was recently elected in Minnesota.

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“The floor of Congress is now going to look like an Islamic republic,” Jackson said. “We are a Judeo-Christian country. We are a nation rooted and grounded in Christianity and that’s that. And anybody that doesn’t like that, go live somewhere else. It’s very simple. Just go live somewhere else. Don’t try to change our country into some sort of Islamic republic or try to base our country on Sharia law.”

Omar and Rep.-elect Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHouse passes spending bill to boost Capitol Police and Hill staffer pay Omar reflects on personal experiences with hate in making case for new envoy House passes bill requiring EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water MORE (D-Mich.) are set to be the first Muslim women in Congress.

Jackson in May lost a Republican primary to represent Virginia in the Senate and before that was the Republican nominee for lieutenant governor in the state in 2013.

During his radio show, he claimed that multiple women will be wearing hijabs on the House floor to honor Omar and not because they are themselves Muslim. 

“The fact that we’re electing these people to Congress and electing them to office is just beyond the pale,” he said. “Now, don’t get me wrong, I believe in the freedom of religion, I believe in the First Amendment, but I’ll tell you what, I’m not voting for a Muslim to serve in any office. Me, personally, I’m not doing it. I’m not doing it. Period. I’m not doing it.”

Jackson said he is not Islamaphobic, but simply does not agree with the religion.

“The threat to humanity is not merely radical Islam,” he added. “The threat to humanity is Islam, period. That’s right, I said it and I mean it.”

Omar called her election to Congress a rejection of “religious bigotry.” 

The Minnesota Democrat is the first Somali-American woman to be elected to Congress from either party. She wears a hijab and is one of the lawmakers leading the effort to reverse the headwear ban on the floor of Congress.

The measure has the support of Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTim Ryan slams McCarthy for mocking Capitol physician, mask mandate McCarthy knocks Pelosi, mask mandate: 'This House has broken the country's trust' Senate votes to take up infrastructure deal MORE (Calif.), as well as multiple other Democratic lawmakers.