Sanders to Colbert: 'You will be my vice presidential candidate!'

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE (I-Vt.) jokingly told CBS late-night host Stephen Colbert that he would be his vice presidential pick if he decided to run for president in 2020.

Sanders, 77, praised other possible Democratic candidates including the congressman who captured national attention for his ultimately failed run against Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrade deal talks expand as Congress debates tech legal shield Sanders meets with MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred Cruz knocks Chick-fil-A over past donation: It has 'lost its way' MORE (R-Texas).

"What do you think of Beto O’Rourke?" asked Colbert.

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"I think he ran a very, very good grassroots campaign in Texas," Sanders responded. "I think [Massachusetts Sen.] Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE is a wonderful, good, dear friend of mine, and there are a number of others, [New Jersey Sen.] Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBloomberg apologizes after critics say his calling Booker 'well spoken' was racist Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Booker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair MORE is a good friend of mine. We work together on many, many issues."

"One has to try to be objective, not subjective, and say, 'OK, do I think I can be the best candidate in helping to turn the country around and helping defeat Trump?' That’s where we are right now."

“OK, so you’re running?" asked Colbert.

"And you will be my vice presidential candidate!" Sanders exclaimed to cheers from "The Late Show's" New York studio audience.

Earlier in the interview, Sanders said running for the highest office in the land can be a "difficult decision for one's family,"

“I know you’re not going to answer the question so I’m not going to ask you if you’re running in 2020. So don’t make me ask it, just tell me,” Colbert said to Sanders, who ran for the Democratic presidential nominee in 2016.

“The answer is, look, when you run for president of the United States, especially in this ugly political world that we live in right now, it is a very difficult decision for one’s family,” Sanders replied.

"And what I am looking at very hard right now is trying to — and there are some really good people out there, many personal friends of mine, who are thinking about running as well — and I’m trying to ascertain, quite honestly, going beyond ego, A, which candidate has the best chance to beat Trump and, B, which candidate’s ideas can most turn this country around so that we have a government that works for all of us and not just the people on top.”

Sanders ran an unexpectedly strong race against Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Top GOP legislator in California leaves party GOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties MORE in 2016, capturing 1,846 delegates to her 2,205. The former secretary of State won more superdelegates, however, 602 to 48. 

The Democratic Party has since faced considerable backlash regarding the power of superdelegates after an outcry from Sanders supporters. 

In June, a Democratic National Committee panel moved forward with a proposal limiting the power of superdelegates in picking future presidential nominees.