Vox's Yglesias: 'Ridiculous' it's unconstitutional for Ocasio-Cortez to run for president

Vox co-founder Matthew Yglesias said Wednesday that it's "ridiculous" that it is unconstitutional for incoming Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Health Care: Global coronavirus cases top 1M | Cities across country in danger of becoming new hotspots | Trump to recommend certain Americans wear masks | Record 6.6M file jobless claims Trump blasts Schumer over 'incorrect sound bites' on coronavirus Trump warns against 'partisan investigations' after Pelosi establishes select committee on virus response MORE (D-N.Y.) to run for president.

"Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is the biggest star in the Democratic Party, and she has been ever since she unseated Rep. Joe CrowleyJoseph (Joe) CrowleyStimulus price tag of .2T falls way short, some experts say Ocasio-Cortez set to make her first appearance on Fox News Progressive organizations throw support to Sanders ahead of Michigan primary MORE in a surprise primary upset in May," Yglesias wrote in a column published Wednesday on Vox. 

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"That her win didn’t, in the final analysis, launch a wave of leftist primary victories only goes to show what a phenomenon she personally is," he added.

Under the Constitution, presidential candidates must be at least 35 years old. 

"While the law prevents anyone under the age of 35 from becoming president, we currently have a septuagenarian in the White House whose frequent nonsensical diatribes and notoriously scattered Twitter outbursts repeatedly raise the prospect of mental decline," Yglesias wrote. "Meanwhile, the top two Democrats in national polling — Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Energy: Oil giants meet with Trump at White House | Interior extends tenure of controversial land management chief | Oil prices tick up on hopes of Russia-Saudi deal Oil giants meet at White House amid talk of buying strategic reserves The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden struggles to stay in the spotlight MORE and Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden struggles to stay in the spotlight Is Texas learning to love ObamaCare? Romney warns Trump: Don't interfere with coronavirus relief oversight MORE — are 77 and 76, respectively."

Yglesias argued that Ocasio-Cortez, 29, "isn't that young." 

"People younger than that are routinely trusted with life-and-death situations in a huge array of contexts, ranging from parenting to military service," he wrote.

Yglesias called the constitutional prohibition a "weird lacuna that was handed down to us from the 18th century," claiming that no one "would seriously propose" such a rule today.

"Realistically, most people that young would simply have a hard time winning an election. But if you can pull it off, you should be allowed," he wrote. "And I kind of think she should run for president."

Ocasio-Cortez stunned the political establishment by upsetting 10-term congressman Joseph Crowley in June's Democratic primary. She went on to win New York's 14th Congressional District in November and has quickly become a force to watch in Washington.

John F. Kennedy was the youngest president ever elected at age 43.