Washington Post calls on Trump, Dems to make a deal on immigration

Washington Post calls on Trump, Dems to make a deal on immigration
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The Washington Post's editorial board is urging President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff urges GOP colleagues to share private concerns about Trump publicly US-China trade talks draw criticism for lack of women in pictures Overnight Defense: Trump to leave 200 troops in Syria | Trump, Kim plan one-on-one meeting | Pentagon asks DHS to justify moving funds for border wall MORE and Democrats to hash out an immigration deal even as the two sides remained far apart on the president's latest proposal.

The editorial board on Saturday ticked through reasons Democrats should not take the deal Trump put forward on Saturday, which includes funding for a border wall and protections for certain immigrants, but argued that the "Dreamers" and Temporary Protected Status recipients who would benefit from a deal should be considered first and foremost.

"Unquestionably a deal would contain galling elements for both sides; that’s the nature of compromise," the editorial board wrote. "But a measure of statesmanship for a member of Congress now is the ability to accept some disappointments, and shrug off the inevitable attacks from purists, if it means rescuing the lives of thousands of deserving people living among us." 

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The editorial board suggested that Trump's suggestion "be welcomed but not accepted as the final word."

"There should be room to talk about the amount of money; how border security will be defined and enhanced; which categories of dreamers and TPS beneficiaries are covered; what their legal status will be, and for how long," it said. "But to refuse even to talk until the government reopens does no favors to sidelined federal workers and contractors."

Trump on Saturday proposed a deal that would include more than $5 billion in funding for a wall along the southern border, a three-year extension of protections for “Dreamers” who benefit from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and Temporary Protected Status holders and funding for additional immigration judges and other border security measures.

The bill, if passed, would end the partial government shutdown, which has lasted 30 days and counting. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he would bring Trump’s proposal up for a vote this week, with some Republicans quickly signaling their support.

Democratic leaders and some rank-and-file members promptly criticized the measure, with Pelosi calling it a "non-starter" and others doubting that Trump can be trusted to keep his end of the deal.