GOP rep who supports lowering voting age: 'It's on us' if 16-year-olds vote Democratic

A House Republican who supports lowering the voting age to 16 said it falls on the GOP if the newly enfranchised voters did not support Republicans.

“If what we are afraid of is they’ll vote Democratic, then that’s on us,” Rep. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessOvernight Health Care: Big Pharma looks to stem losses after trade deal defeat | House panel to examine federal marijuana policies | House GOP reopens investigation into opioid manufacturers Lawmakers express alarm over rise in cocaine overdose deaths Hillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware MORE (R-Texas) told Fox News’s Tucker Carlson on Tuesday. “We need to talk to people. We have better ideas. We’re the party of emancipation.”

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Earlier this month, Congress voted down an amendment lowering the voting age to 16 that Rep. Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyCongressional Progressive Caucus co-chair Jayapal endorses Sanders Sanders, Warren battle for progressive endorsements Ayanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia MORE (D-Mass.) was pushing to add to a larger voting rights bill. House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats worry a speedy impeachment trial will shut out public Schiff huddles in Capitol with impeachment managers Media's selective outrage exposed in McSally-Raju kerfuffle MORE (D-Calif.) said the following week she supported efforts to reduce the age.

“My first thought was ‘Oh no, that’s not a good idea,’ but as I thought about it, you think about things through the lens of your own experience,” said Burgess, the only Republican to vote for the amendment, citing the fact that as a 16-year-old he already participated in society in various ways, including working and paying payroll taxes.

Burgess also noted “this generation of adolescents is going to inherit more debt than any other generation,” as well as structural debt and student loan debt.

Carlson pushed back, arguing 16-year-old voters would support policies that incur further debt. 

“What are we afraid of? Sixteen-year-olds are going to be 18-year-olds in the next election cycle,” Burgess said. “They’re not going to be in charge of the government any more than 18-year-olds are.”