Fox's Napolitano: Mueller report 'might be enough to prosecute' Trump

Fox News legal analyst Andrew Napolitano said Thursday that evidence detailed in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE's report “might be enough to prosecute” President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem senator says Zelensky was 'feeling the pressure' to probe Bidens 2020 Dems slam Trump decision on West Bank settlements Trump calls latest impeachment hearings 'a great day for Republicans' MORE

“Depending upon how you look at them, it might be enough to prosecute,” Napolitano said on his series “Judge Napolitano’s Chambers.”

“But it did show a venal, amoral, deceptive Donald Trump, instructing his aides to lie and willing to help them do so. That’s not good in the president of the United States,” he added. 

“On obstruction of justice … the president is not exactly cleared,” he also said on the show, pointing to nearly a dozen instances of potential obstruction detailed in the report.

ADVERTISEMENT

Napolitano previously weighed in on the Mueller report last month, following a summary issued by Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrGOP rep predicts watchdog report on alleged FISA abuses will find 'problems' Barr defends Trump's use of executive authority, slams impeachment hearings GOP eager for report on alleged FBI surveillance abuse MORE

“In the 700-page summary of the 2 million pages of raw evidence, there is undoubtedly some evidence of a conspiracy and some evidence of obstruction of justice,” Napolitano said last month. “Just not enough evidence.”

The Justice Department on Thursday released Mueller's report on his nearly two-year investigation into whether Russia interfered in the 2016 election. The report detailed 10 episodes in which Trump might have obstructed justice.  

Barr said in a summary of the report prior to its release that he and Deputy Attorney General Rob Rosenstein had determined that there was not sufficient evidence to pursue an obstruction of justice charge against the president.