Fox's Bartiromo: Border story should lead evening news 'every night'

Fox's Bartiromo: Border story should lead evening news 'every night'
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Fox Business and Fox News host Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoGOP lawmakers press Trump to cut deal with China at G-20 The Hill's Morning Report - Warren cements front-runner status in first Dem debate George Conway: Trump needs a hospital after Mueller accusation MORE is pushing for news outlets to put more emphasis on the situation at the southern border, arguing it deserves to be a top story amid intense debate over how to handle asylum claims.
 
"I have no idea why this is not top of news, every night on the evening news and every morning," Bartiromo said of the situation at the border in a phone interview with The Hill. "Because what is happening here is so incredible."
 
Bartiromo's Fox News program, "Sunday Morning Futures," recently ventured to El Paso, Texas, to interview and ride along with U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents for a firsthand look at the situation at the U.S.-Mexico border.
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The trip included interviewing immigrants claiming asylum at the border for economic hardship reasons. Asylum is usually granted to those seeking protection from persecution.
 
"Most of the people I interviewed in terms of the migrants coming across said nothing about 'We’re being attacked, we’re being followed.' All they said was, 'Well, I think my daughter can get a better job in America, I think there is more economic opportunity here in America,' " the former CNBC host said.
 
"So a lot of these people are claiming asylum when it's not really asylum, it's not really political, it's just, 'I want to go to America because I want to have a better opportunity for my family,' which is a fine reason to come to America, but there is a legal way to do it."
 
President TrumpDonald John TrumpFacebook releases audit on conservative bias claims Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Recessions happen when presidents overlook key problems MORE joined Bartiromo for a phone interview on "Sunday Morning Futures" on April 28 while the show was broadcasting from El Paso. During the interview, the president called the situation at the border "a disaster" and compared it to "Disneyland."
 
"On a humane basis, it's bad," Trump said. "We go out and stop the separation and the problem is you have 10 times as many people coming up with their families."
 
"It's like Disneyland now," he said. "Before you would get separated and some people would say let's not go up. Now, you don't get separated, and while that sounds nice and all, what happens is you have 10 times as many people coming up because they know they're not going to be separated from their children. So it turned out to be a disincentive, which is obviously a disaster. It's a disaster."
 
Trump unveiled a new immigration plan on Thursday that aims to move the U.S. toward a “merit-based” system that advocates high-skilled workers over migrants who already have family members living in the United States, declaring it would make the country “the envy of the world.”
 
“Today we are presenting a clear contrast,” Trump said in prepared remarks at the White House Rose Garden. “Democrats are proposing open borders, lower wages and, frankly, lawless chaos. We are proposing an immigration plan that puts the jobs, wages and safety of American workers first.”  
 
Leaders of the Democratic-controlled House immediately ripped the plan ahead of its rollout last week, with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiJohnson eyes Irish border in Brexit negotiations Mueller report fades from political conversation Five key players in Trump's trade battles MORE (D-Calif.) calling a merit-based system "condescending."
 
“It is really a condescending word. They’re saying family is without merit?" Pelosi said to reporters at a weekly press conference.
 
"Are they saying most of the people who have ever come to the United States in the history of our country are without merit because they don’t have an engineering degree?" Pelosi added.
 
The Trump plan has little chance of passing in the House, but could be used as a platform for the incumbent's 2020 reelection campaign.
 
Apprehensions and denials of migrants at the nation's southern border hit 109,144 in April, the highest number in a single month in 12 years, according to federal data released earlier this month.