Ocasio-Cortez hits NYT over story on Hope Hicks: It's framed 'as some Lifetime drama'

Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezFive takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? Ocasio-Cortez to endorse Sanders for president MORE (N.Y.) criticized The New York Times on Sunday over an article on President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE's former communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksTrump: 'Top shows' on Fox News, cable are 'Fair (or great)' to me Trump criticizes Fox, which 'isn't working for us anymore' Sarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor MORE, saying their coverage of her decision to comply with a subpoena read "as some Lifetime drama called 'Hope's Choice.'"

The freshman lawmaker wrote two tweets echoing media figures' criticism of the article, which looks at Hicks's history in the White House and how she might respond to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerBarr to speak at Notre Dame law school on Friday The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Ignore the hype — this is not an impeachment inquiry MORE's (D-N.Y.) recent subpoena for her to testify as part of a sprawling investigation into the Trump administration.

"What gets me is news breaks that this woman is weighing committing a crime before Congress &it’s getting framed by the NYT as some Lifetime drama called 'Hope’s Choice,'" Ocasio-Cortez wrote in one tweet.

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"In the immediate aftermath of shootings, media routinely post menacing photos of people-of-color victims + dredge up any questionable thing they’d ever done," she wrote in another tweet. "But when Hope Hicks considers not complying w a subpoena, it’s glamour shot time."
 

Ocasio-Cortez's criticism added to that of media figures who said failing to comply with a subpoena is a crime and not something "to decide." 

Subpoenas from House Democrats have become the center of a feud between the White House and congressional committees investigating the president. 

President Trump ordered former White House counsel Don McGahn not to comply with a subpoena earlier this month, prompting Nadler to threaten to hold him in contempt.