Man accused of creating fake Pelosi video plans to sue Daily Beast

Shawn Brooks, the man accused by a Daily Beast reporter of creating an online video altered to make it seem as if Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiKlobuchar shuts down idea a woman can't beat Trump: 'Pelosi does it every day' Budowsky: Trump destroying GOP in 2018, '19, '20 On The Money: Senate scraps plan to force second shutdown vote | Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny | McConnell rips House Dems for holding up trade deal MORE (D-Calif.) were drunk, said Sunday he is planning to sue the publication and the reporter for publishing "inaccurate trash."

“I'm looking at my options for possible legal action against anyone who was associated in publishing that inaccurate trash article about me, misquoting me and accusing me of being the creator of the Speaker Pelosi video that went viral,” Brooks said on a GoFundMe page he created on June 2.

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Brooks has set a goal of raising $10,000.00. He had raised more than $4,400 as of Monday morning.

The possible lawsuit comes after reporter Kevin Poulsen wrote in a story published Saturday night that said he was able to determine who was behind the video, which has been viewed millions of times. The video was removed by YouTube but is still up on Facebook.

Poulsen's piece also includes Brooks's age, city of residence and a note that he is on probation after a guilty plea for domestic battery. The story also originally included a photo of Brooks that has since been taken down.

"Brooks, a 34-year-old day laborer currently on probation after pleading guilty to domestic battery, claims that his 'drunk' commentary on an unaltered Pelosi video had no connection to the now-infamous fake clip that premiered less than 15 minutes later," the Daily Beast reported.

In a phone interview with the reporter, Brooks insisted he didn't created the doctored content, but did admit he is one of the administrators of a group called Politics WatchDog that originally posted the video.

"It’s conceivable that someone else actually edited the clip," Poulsen said. But a Facebook official, confirming a Daily Beast investigation, said the video was first posted on Politics WatchDog directly from Brooks’s personal Facebook account.

Several journalists railed against Poulsen for sharing Brooks's personal information over the weekend on Twitter.

The Hill has reached out to the Daily Beast and Poulsen for comment.