Meghan McCain: 'I feel slighted as a conservative' by Biden flip-flop on Hyde Amendment

Meghan McCain: 'I feel slighted as a conservative' by Biden flip-flop on Hyde Amendment
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Meghan McCainMeghan Marguerite McCainKasich to Meghan McCain: Concern over abortion 'dwarfed' by need to beat Trump Meghan McCain says she believes report Trump called fallen soldiers 'losers' Meghan McCain hits Ivanka Trump's defense of president's Twitter: It's not a 'communication style,' it's 'cruelty' MORE said Monday that former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Fox News poll: Biden ahead of Trump in Nevada, Pennsylvania and Ohio MORE's flip-flop on the Hyde Amendment is a "shot fired" at conservatives and will hurt him with centrist voters he needs to win over to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpSteele Dossier sub-source was subject of FBI counterintelligence probe Pelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Trump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance MORE in the general election.
 
"He was for it for 40 years," McCain, a co-host of "The View," said on the program Monday.
 
"I actually was surprised by [Biden's flip] because he is filling the moderate compromise lane as the candidate and you are not going to out-progressive progressives," she said.
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“He is alienating the lane that I still see as the easiest way to beat President Trump, and [Biden is] alienating a lot of moderate and especially pro-lifers like me — this is kind of a shot fired,” she continued.

"Obviously, I hate President Trump and I think just on a moral and ethical standpoint, he isn’t fit to serve. But when you are talking about brass politics, I feel slighted as a conservative, and I feel slighted as someone who was open to [Biden] being president. I think that it is a dangerous lane for him to take for him to go super-far left. It's very dangerous," she said.
 
Biden announced last week that he would oppose the Hyde Amendment, which bars federal funds from being used for abortion. He did so after his campaign initially said he continued to support Hyde. Most of Biden's rivals oppose the language, arguing it disproportionately hits poor and minority women.
 
Biden is currently the front-runner among the 24 candidates seeking the Democratic nomination, but has seen his lead reduced recently.

A Saturday Des Moines Register-CNN poll of Iowa voters showed Biden at 24 percent support among Iowa voters, with Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump faces backlash after not committing to peaceful transition of power Bernie Sanders: 'This is an election between Donald Trump and democracy' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump stokes fears over November election outcome MORE (I-Vt.) at 16 percent, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline Democratic senators ask inspector general to investigate IRS use of location tracking service MORE (D-Mass.) at 15 percent and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBillionaire who donated to Trump in 2016 donates to Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - GOP closes ranks to fill SCOTUS vacancy by November Buttigieg stands in as Pence for Harris's debate practice MORE (D) at 14 percent.
 
There has been some talk that the McCain family could endorse Biden, though her mother, Cindy McCain, denied a report about a forthcoming endorsement in the Washington Examiner.