George Conway pens op-ed calling for Trump impeachment proceedings

Lawyer George ConwayGeorge Thomas ConwayGeorge Conway: Giuliani tweet 'by itself establishes' that Trump 'committed an impeachable offense' Conway calls it 'silly' to say she threatened Washington Examiner reporter Reporter posts heated phone call with Kellyanne Conway MORE and law professor Neal Katyal penned an op-ed published in The Washington Post on Wednesday calling for impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald John TrumpKatie Pavlich: Schiff's shifting standards Fox News legal analyst says quid pro quo is 'clearly impeachable': Trump requested 'criminal' act On The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs MORE to begin.

Katyal and Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayVaping advocates feel confident Trump will turn from flavor ban Impeachment week: Trump probe hits crucial point Krystal Ball praises former McConnell aide's historic win in Kentucky MORE and a frequent critic of Trump on Twitter, say Trump’s court filing arguing he cannot be investigated by Congress is the most recent indicator that lawmakers should begin impeachment proceedings.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump “filed a brief in the nation’s second-most-important court that takes the position that Congress cannot investigate the president, except possibly in impeachment proceedings. It’s a spectacularly anti-constitutional brief, and anyone who harbors such attitudes toward our Constitution’s architecture is not fit for office,” the two men wrote.

The two lawyers wrote that the brief “is nothing if not an invitation to commencing impeachment proceedings that, for reasons set out in the Mueller report, should have already commenced.”

Conway and Katyal are referring to an appeals brief filed by Trump’s lawyers in the U.S. District Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia that argues against the House Oversight and Reform Committee’s ongoing probe into Trump’s business ventures and whether he broke the law by committing financial and tax fraud.

Trump "argues that Congress is 'trying to prove that the President broke the law' and that that’s something Congress can’t do, because it’s 'an exercise of law enforcement authority that the Constitution reserves to the executive branch,'" Conway and Katyal wrote.

The drumbeat of Democratic lawmakers calling for impeachment proceedings to begin has been growing, particularly after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE gave his only public comments regarding the findings of his report into Russian election interference.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats sharpen their message on impeachment Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate Siren song of impeachment lures Democrats toward election doom MORE (D-Calif.) has tempered the conversation about impeaching Trump, pointing to the lack of Republican support outside of Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon Hoyer: We are going to move as fast 'as the facts and truth dictate' on open hearings Conway spars with Wallace on whether White House will cooperate with impeachment inquiry after formal vote MORE (R-Mich.), who has been the only Republican to publicly back opening impeachment proceedings.

“Congress could investigate Trump’s finances in an impeachment proceeding, but it can do so without launching the formal process of impeachment,” Conway and Katyal wrote, concluding that “Trump’s brief can be construed as an invitation to commence impeachment proceedings. In those proceedings, Trump’s attitudes toward our Constitution’s checks and balances, in addition to evidence of obstruction of justice, must play a key role.”