SPONSORED:

George Conway pens op-ed calling for Trump impeachment proceedings

Lawyer George ConwayGeorge Thomas ConwayRaccoon that 'attacked' news crews on White House lawn sparks viral jokes George and Kellyanne Conway honor Ginsburg Lincoln Project releases new ad blasting Trump as 'a horrible role model' MORE and law professor Neal Katyal penned an op-ed published in The Washington Post on Wednesday calling for impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE to begin.

Katyal and Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayBillboard warns Trump's Iowa rally will be 'superspreader event' White House Halloween to be 'modified' to meet CDC guidelines: report Minnesota health officials connect COVID-19 cases to Trump, Biden campaign events MORE and a frequent critic of Trump on Twitter, say Trump’s court filing arguing he cannot be investigated by Congress is the most recent indicator that lawmakers should begin impeachment proceedings.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump “filed a brief in the nation’s second-most-important court that takes the position that Congress cannot investigate the president, except possibly in impeachment proceedings. It’s a spectacularly anti-constitutional brief, and anyone who harbors such attitudes toward our Constitution’s architecture is not fit for office,” the two men wrote.

The two lawyers wrote that the brief “is nothing if not an invitation to commencing impeachment proceedings that, for reasons set out in the Mueller report, should have already commenced.”

Conway and Katyal are referring to an appeals brief filed by Trump’s lawyers in the U.S. District Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia that argues against the House Oversight and Reform Committee’s ongoing probe into Trump’s business ventures and whether he broke the law by committing financial and tax fraud.

Trump "argues that Congress is 'trying to prove that the President broke the law' and that that’s something Congress can’t do, because it’s 'an exercise of law enforcement authority that the Constitution reserves to the executive branch,'" Conway and Katyal wrote.

The drumbeat of Democratic lawmakers calling for impeachment proceedings to begin has been growing, particularly after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE gave his only public comments regarding the findings of his report into Russian election interference.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: McConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a Senate vote | Pelosi, Mnuchin see progress, but no breakthrough | Trump, House lawyers return to court in fight over financial records Progress, but no breakthrough, on coronavirus relief McConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a vote in Senate MORE (D-Calif.) has tempered the conversation about impeaching Trump, pointing to the lack of Republican support outside of Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashHillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones House votes to condemn alleged hysterectomies on migrant women House approves measure condemning QAnon, but 17 Republicans vote against it MORE (R-Mich.), who has been the only Republican to publicly back opening impeachment proceedings.

“Congress could investigate Trump’s finances in an impeachment proceeding, but it can do so without launching the formal process of impeachment,” Conway and Katyal wrote, concluding that “Trump’s brief can be construed as an invitation to commence impeachment proceedings. In those proceedings, Trump’s attitudes toward our Constitution’s checks and balances, in addition to evidence of obstruction of justice, must play a key role.”