Bolton pushes back on North Korea negotiations report

U.S. national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonLiz Cheney says world is more stable, 'safer' under Trump Bolton exit provokes questions about Trump shift on Iran Trump needs a national security adviser who 'speaks softly' MORE on Monday pushed back on a New York Times report suggesting the U.S. may accept a "nuclear freeze" from North Korea in a new round of negotiations.

"I read this NYT story with curiosity," Bolton tweeted.

"Neither the NSC [National Security Council] staff nor I have discussed or heard of any desire to 'settle for a nuclear freeze by NK.' This was a reprehensible attempt by someone to box in the President. There should be consequences."

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The story was printed in the Times's "News Analysis" section and claimed that in new negotiations with North Korea the U.S. may be willing to tacitly accept the country as a nuclear power.

That approach would enshrine the status quo, stopping North Korea's nuclear arsenal from growing, but not requiring the dismantling of any weapons the rogue nation may currently have.

"We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting," Times vice president of communications Danielle Rhoades Ha told The Hill.

Ha also pointed to a line in the story that notes the “administration still insists in public and in private that its goals remain full denuclearization.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE made history Sunday by becoming the first sitting U.S. president to enter North Korea when he and North Korean leader Kim Jong UnKim Jong UnTrump to have dinner with Otto Warmbier's parents: report Ted Lieu congratulates first Asian American cast member on 'Saturday Night Live' Overnight Defense: Trump marks 9/11 anniversary with Taliban warning | President rips into Bolton as 'Mr. Tough Guy' | More turmoil trips up government funding MORE met for a surprise negotiation session that lasted almost an hour on the South Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone.

Trump has touted the meeting as a diplomatic success that will improve U.S.-North Korea ties. The president has met with Kim three times now in efforts to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.

Bolton's pushback on the Times's report continues the administration's adversarial relationship with media. The president has often lashed out at critical pieces on his administration and has called the media the "enemy of the people." 

Earlier this month, he accused the Times of treason, a crime punishable by death, after the newspaper reported the U.S. is stepping up its use of cyberattacks against Russia.

Updated at 8:59 a.m.