Bolton pushes back on North Korea negotiations report

U.S. national security adviser John BoltonJohn Robert BoltonWill Iran 'break out' for a nuclear weapon, and what can Trump do? Hillicon Valley: FTC reportedly settles with Facebook for B fine | Trump calls to regulate Facebook's crypto project | Court rules Pentagon can award B 'war cloud' contract | Study shows automation will hit rural areas hardest Trump again considering dismissing intelligence chief Dan Coats: report MORE on Monday pushed back on a New York Times report suggesting the U.S. may accept a "nuclear freeze" from North Korea in a new round of negotiations.

"I read this NYT story with curiosity," Bolton tweeted.

"Neither the NSC [National Security Council] staff nor I have discussed or heard of any desire to 'settle for a nuclear freeze by NK.' This was a reprehensible attempt by someone to box in the President. There should be consequences."

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The story was printed in the Times's "News Analysis" section and claimed that in new negotiations with North Korea the U.S. may be willing to tacitly accept the country as a nuclear power.

That approach would enshrine the status quo, stopping North Korea's nuclear arsenal from growing, but not requiring the dismantling of any weapons the rogue nation may currently have.

"We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting," Times vice president of communications Danielle Rhoades Ha told The Hill.

Ha also pointed to a line in the story that notes the “administration still insists in public and in private that its goals remain full denuclearization.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE made history Sunday by becoming the first sitting U.S. president to enter North Korea when he and North Korean leader Kim Jong UnKim Jong UnNew photo of Trump with Kim Jong Un hung in the White House North Korea warns US-South Korea drills threaten nuclear talks Member of Senate GOP leadership says Trump tweets are racist MORE met for a surprise negotiation session that lasted almost an hour on the South Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone.

Trump has touted the meeting as a diplomatic success that will improve U.S.-North Korea ties. The president has met with Kim three times now in efforts to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.

Bolton's pushback on the Times's report continues the administration's adversarial relationship with media. The president has often lashed out at critical pieces on his administration and has called the media the "enemy of the people." 

Earlier this month, he accused the Times of treason, a crime punishable by death, after the newspaper reported the U.S. is stepping up its use of cyberattacks against Russia.

Updated at 8:59 a.m.