Scarborough says Trump donors are financing white supremacy

MNSBC host Joe ScarboroughCharles (Joe) Joseph ScarboroughHillicon Valley: NSA warns of new security threats | Teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty | Experts warn of mail-in voting misinformation House Democrat calls on Facebook to take down doctored Pelosi video Hillicon Valley: Trump backs potential Microsoft, TikTok deal, sets September deadline | House Republicans request classified TikTok briefing | Facebook labels manipulated Pelosi video MORE said Monday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTeachers union launches 0K ad buy calling for education funding in relief bill FDA head pledges 'we will not cut corners' on coronavirus vaccine Let our values drive COVID-19 liability protection MORE’s reelection campaign donors are funding white supremacy. 

“The president never tones down his rhetoric. In fact, for those of you who are funding Donald Trump’s reelection campaign, you may want to take note that because you keep writing checks to this president it’s on you, it really is, because you are funding this white supremacist campaign,” Scarborough said on "Morning Joe." 

The former Republican congressman called out the “CEOs,” “business people,” “millionaires and billionaires” who are donating to Trump despite what Scarborough said are continued white supremacist attacks by the president.

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“It’s your money that is funding this white supremacy because you won't tell him to stop. You won’t tell him 'talk about the economy and I’ll write you a check, keep up the white supremacist attacks and I’m gonna ask for a refund,'” he said. 

“Why is that? Are you a white supremacist? Does your company support white supremacy? Does a corporation that you run, do they support white supremacy? Because the attacks and the attempts continue.”

Scarborough’s remarks come after two deadly shootings over the weekend, including one at a Walmart in a Hispanic community near the Mexican border in El Paso, Texas.

The suspect in that mass shooting allegedly wrote a racist, anti-immigrant manifesto before the attack, which described fears of a Latino “invasion."

Democratic leaders have drawn comparisons between the suspect’s alleged motives and Trump’s immigration rhetoric and suggested the president helped fuel the environment that led to the attack.

Trump has offered few public remarks on the shootings, other than to say "hate has no place" in the country.

The president has also been criticized for attacks targeting elected minority officials and for not quelling a chant of “send her back,” referring to Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarMatt Gaetz, Roger Stone back far-right activist Laura Loomer in congressional bid The Hill's Campaign Report: LIVE: Trump from Gettysburg | The many unknowns of 2020 | Omar among those facing primary challenges 'This already exists': Democrats seize on potential Trump executive order on preexisting conditions MORE (D-Minn.), at a Trump rally in North Carolina. 

Trump has denied that any of his actions, including telling minority progressive congresswomen to “go back” where they came from and calling Baltimore “rodent infested,” are racist. 

The Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised a combined $108 million in the second quarter. 

A spokesperson for the Trump campaign was not immediately available for comment.