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Ben Shapiro: No prominent GOP figure ever questioned Obama's legitimacy

Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro said he wasn’t aware of “a single major Republican figure” that made claims of former President Obama being an illegitimate president, seemingly ignoring President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Illinois House passes bill that would mandate Asian-American history lessons in schools Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he MORE’s repeated assertions that Obama was not born in the U.S. 

“Republicans impeached Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBiden must compel China and Russia to act on climate A leadership menagerie of metaphorical scapegoats How Democrats can defy the odds in 2022 MORE in the 1990s, they never made a move to impeach Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden can make history on nuclear arms reductions Biden has nearly 90-point approval gap between Democrats, Republicans: poll The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring MORE despite the myriad of scandals that cropped up during his administration,” Shapiro said in a video clip reported Monday by The Daily Beast

Shapiro did not elaborate on the “myriad of scandals” he is referencing.

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“I’m not aware of a single major Republican figure who said Barack Obama is not the president of the United States," he added.

Trump help spur the "birtherism" conspiracy theory before he entered politics with unfounded accusations that Obama was not born in the U.S. He was among the most prominent figures to call on Obama to produce his birth certificate, not typically asked of presidential candidates, when he discussed a possible 2012 presidential run. 

Trump finally admitted the fact that the then-president was born in the U.S. in September 2016, without apologizing or explaining the change in his beliefs. 

Other prominent Republicans backed the conspiracy theory, including Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsBoehner finally calls it as he sees it Stephen Miller launching group to challenge Democrats' policies through lawsuits A year with the coronavirus: How we got here MORE (R-N.C.), who campaigned in 2012 saying he wanted to send Obama “home to Kenya.” 

Obama was born in Hawaii.