CNN, NY Times to host next Democratic debate in October

CNN, NY Times to host next Democratic debate in October
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CNN and The New York Times will jointly host the next Democratic presidential debate in mid-October, the outlets announced Friday.

The debate will be held at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, on Oct. 15 and feature 11 candidates who have already been announced as meeting the qualifications for the debate stage.

A second debate night will be scheduled if more candidates meet the polling threshold by Oct. 2, according to a press release from CNN.

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News of who will host the next debate comes a day after the top 10 candidates in the crowded Democratic field appeared for the third debate in Houston, hosted by ABC News.

That event featured former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPelosi sets Thursday vote on bipartisan infrastructure bill Pressure grows to cut diplomatic red tape for Afghans left behind President Biden is making the world a more dangerous place MORE and Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenIn defense of share buybacks Democrats urge Biden to go all in with agenda in limbo In Washington, the road almost never taken MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernie Sanders Texas House Republican tests positive for coronavirus in latest breakthrough case In defense of share buybacks Progressives seething over Biden's migrant policies MORE (I-Vt.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden, Harris push big lie about Border Patrol Two 'View' hosts test positive for coronavirus ahead of Harris interview Rep. Karen Bass to run for mayor of Los Angeles: report MORE (D-Calif.) all on stage together for the first time.

The fourth debate will be moderated by CNN anchors Anderson Cooper and Erin Burnett and New York Times national editor Marc Lacey.

Cooper and Burnett did not moderate the first debate, which was hosted by CNN and moderated by anchors Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperGottheimer: 'No reason' why Democrats shouldn't pass infrastructure bill right away Frederica Wilson rails against Haitian deportation flights, calls treatment 'inhumane' WHIP LIST: How House Democrats say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE and Don LemonDon Carlton LemonBiden's candidness can get him in trouble Tucker Carlson says he lies when 'I'm really cornered or something' CNN's Chris Cuomo taking birthday vacation as calls for brother's resignation grow MORE and chief political correspondent Dana BashDana BashManchin suggests pausing talks on .5 trillion package until 2022: report House is no easy road for Biden, Democrats on .5T package Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by Climate Power — Manchin: key energy provision of spending package 'makes no sense' MORE.

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) criteria for participating in the next debate includes a 2 percent polling threshold in four DNC-approved polls and at least 130,000 unique donors, including 400 donors each from at least 20 states.

So far, 11 candidates have met the criteria, including billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE, who did not qualify for Thursday night's debate.

Other candidates who are scheduled to participate in next month's event are former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerLawmakers gear up for spending bill, infrastructure votes Booker: End of police reform negotiations a 'frustrating experience' Sunday shows - All eyes on spending votes MORE (D-N.J.), South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegDOJ sues to block JetBlue-American Airlines partnership On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Pelosi plows full speed ahead on jam-packed agenda Blumenthal calls on Buttigieg to investigate American Airlines-JetBlue partnership MORE, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Officials want action on cyberattacks Senate panel advances antitrust bill that eyes Google, Facebook This week: Democrats face mounting headaches MORE (D-Minn.), former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeAnti-Trump Republicans on the line in 2022 too Matthew McConaughey on potential political run: 'I'm measuring it' Anti-Greg Abbott TV ad pulled minutes before college football game: Lincoln Project MORE (D-Texas), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and businessman Andrew YangAndrew YangYang's new party will be called 'The Forward Party' Andrew Yang planning to launch third party: report Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary MORE.

Updated at 2:42 p.m.