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Fox News legal analyst: Trump's Ukraine call 'manifested both criminal and impeachable behavior'

Fox News legal analyst Andrew NapolitanoAndrew Peter NapolitanoFox's Napolitano says grand jury erred in Taylor case: 'I would have indicted all three of them' Fox's Napolitano: Supreme Court confirmation hearings will be 'World War III of political battles' Fox's Napolitano: 2000 election will look like 'child's play' compared to 2020 legal battles MORE is arguing that President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSAID administrator tests positive for COVID-19 Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year DOJ appeals ruling preventing it from replacing Trump in E. Jean Carroll defamation lawsuit MORE committed an impeachable offense during a July 25 phone call in which he pressured the Ukrainian president to investigate 2020 presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenHarris says she has 'not yet' spoken to Pence Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year Obama: Republican Party members believe 'white males are victims' MORE and his son. 

"That conversation manifested both criminal and impeachable behavior," Napolitano writes in a Fox News column focused on a whistleblower complaint that accuses Trump of enlisting Ukraine's help in his 2020 reelection efforts. 

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Napolitano goes on to assert that "the criminal behavior to which Trump has admitted is much more grave than anything alleged or unearthed by Special Counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE." 

The column is accompanied by a web video in which Napolitano summarizes the revelations from a White House memorandum of Trump's conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. The White House issued the memo just a day before the public disclosure of the intelligence community whistleblower complaint. 

Napolitano zeroes in on a portion of the White House readout in which Trump asks for a "favor" from Zelensky after the Ukrainian leader talks about the prospect of buying U.S. anti-tank missiles. 

Trump's request occurred around the same time that the U.S. delayed nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine, raising speculation from many Democratic lawmakers as to whether the president was looking to use the aid as leverage in the talks. 

"He held up that aid and instead asked for a favor, which arguably was for his political campaign," Napolitano says. "That was a violation of federal law. That is an impeachable offense."

Trump has denied holding up military aid to Ukraine as part of an effort to persuade the nation into investigating the Biden family. But Napolitano asserts that Trump's request for a "favor" is evidence of a quid pro quo. 

"In the Zelensky phone call, he told the Ukrainian president that he needed a personal 'favor,' " Napolitano writes in the column. "The clear unmistakable inference is that the $391 million in aid would be held up until the favor was delivered. The favor he sought was dirt on Biden."

The former New Jersey Superior Court judge's remarks come as Trump faces escalating scrutiny regarding his efforts to get a foreign nation to find dirt on a top political opponent. The revelations prompted Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGovernors take heat for violating their own coronavirus restrictions Spending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation MORE (D-Calif.) to announce a formal impeachment inquiry of Trump in the House. 

Before the memo's release, Napolitano had said that Trump had already confessed to "a crime" by acknowledging that he'd asked the Ukrainian leader to look into Biden.

Trump has repeatedly defended his interactions with Zelensky, going so far as to call the July 25 phone call "perfect." He's also decried the impeachment inquiry as a "coup" and accused the whistleblower of being a spy.