Tucker Carlson criticizes Trump's Ukraine call

Tucker CarlsonTucker CarlsonFox's Neil Cavuto rips into Trump over attacks on Chris Wallace's impeachment coverage CBS employee fired for allegedly leaking Robach hot mic clip denies she leaked the tape Megyn Kelly teases interview with woman reportedly fired after leak of hot mic Epstein video MORE criticized President TrumpDonald John TrumpMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns Trump's doctor issues letter addressing 'speculation' about visit to Walter Reed MORE's phone call with the president of Ukraine in an op-ed for the Daily Caller on Thursday.

The Daily Caller co-founder and Fox News host, however, doesn't support the Democrats' ongoing impeachment inquiry.

In an op-ed written with fellow Daily Caller co-founder Neil Patel, Carlson wrote that "Donald Trump should not have been on the phone with a foreign head of state encouraging another country to investigate his political opponent, Joe BidenJoe BidenMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Democrats release two new transcripts ahead of next public impeachment hearings Press: Ukraine's not the only outrage MORE."

"Some Republicans are trying, but there’s no way to spin this as a good idea," he added. 

But Carlson said he doesn't view the call as an impeachable offense, even if he doesn't condone it.

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Carlson asserts that it is "hard to argue" that Trump's behavior is worthy of impeachment.

"The president did not, as was first reported, offer a quid pro quo to the Ukrainians," Carlson wrote.

"He did not condition any U.S. support on a Biden investigation. The Justice Department has already looked at the totality of the call and determined that Trump did not break the law," he added.

The conservative commentator wrote that ultimately it's up to the American people to decide the fate of Trump through the upcoming election.

"America’s founders set up a pretty good system to have just this sort of debate every four years: It’s called an election," Carlson said.