SE Cupp: How much longer will allies excuse Trump's behavior?

CNN host S.E. Cupp questioned President TrumpDonald John TrumpPence: It's not a "foregone conclusion" that lawmakers impeach Trump FBI identifies Pensacola shooter as Saudi Royal Saudi Air Force second lieutenant Trump calls Warren 'Pocahontas,' knocks wealth tax MORE's allies for sticking by him as the impeachment inquiry continues, asking, "How much longer do they keep saying this was OK?"

Cupp described Trump's interaction with Ukraine and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky as "black and white" and "really, really simple" on her Saturday show "S.E. Cupp Unfiltered." 

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"Now, you can decide whether all of this is impeachable or not, but it’s what happened, and the people surrounding Trump need to ask themselves a pretty serious question. How much longer do they keep saying this was OK?" Cupp said.

As the president faces an official impeachment inquiry in the House, many Republicans have stood by his side and defended him.

The CNN host also analyzed the president's reaction to the impeachment inquiry and categorized it as "DNA," meaning "deny, normalize and attack." 

The president initially denied asking the Ukrainian president to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPence: It's not a "foregone conclusion" that lawmakers impeach Trump Warren, Buttigieg fight echoes 2004 campaign, serves as warning for 2020 race Trump: Giuliani to deliver report on Ukraine trip to Congress, Barr MORE. But once the White House released the summary of the call, he called the conversation "perfect."

Cupp said Trump has now moved  "on to the attack stage," referencing Trump's tweets about Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffPence's office questions Schiff's request to declassify more material from official's testimony: report Sunday talk shows: Lawmakers gear up ahead of Monday's House Judiciary hearing Trump denies report that he still uses personal cell phone for calls MORE (D-Calif.) and Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyHere are the Senate Republicans who could vote to convict Trump Statesmen seek bipartisan solutions to big challenges Georgia ready for unpredictable Senate race MORE (R-Utah) on Sunday morning.

The House inquiry began after reports surfaced about Trump's request to the Ukrainian president, which came days after Trump decided to withhold military aid from Ukraine. 

The president has criticized Schiff because of his leading role in the investigation and Romney for saying what Trump did was "wrong and appalling."