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SE Cupp: How much longer will allies excuse Trump's behavior?

CNN host S.E. Cupp questioned President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE's allies for sticking by him as the impeachment inquiry continues, asking, "How much longer do they keep saying this was OK?"

Cupp described Trump's interaction with Ukraine and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky as "black and white" and "really, really simple" on her Saturday show "S.E. Cupp Unfiltered." 

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"Now, you can decide whether all of this is impeachable or not, but it’s what happened, and the people surrounding Trump need to ask themselves a pretty serious question. How much longer do they keep saying this was OK?" Cupp said.

As the president faces an official impeachment inquiry in the House, many Republicans have stood by his side and defended him.

The CNN host also analyzed the president's reaction to the impeachment inquiry and categorized it as "DNA," meaning "deny, normalize and attack." 

The president initially denied asking the Ukrainian president to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter Trump narrows Biden's lead in Pennsylvania: poll Florida breaks first-day early voting record with 350K ballots cast MORE. But once the White House released the summary of the call, he called the conversation "perfect."

Cupp said Trump has now moved  "on to the attack stage," referencing Trump's tweets about Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHillicon Valley: DOJ accuses Russian hackers of targeting 2018 Olympics, French elections | Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats | House Democrats slam FCC over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats Ratcliffe, Schiff battle over Biden emails, politicized intelligence MORE (D-Calif.) and Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGOP noncommittal about vote on potential Trump-Pelosi coronavirus deal 10 bellwether counties that could signal where the election is headed The Memo: Trump's second-term chances fade MORE (R-Utah) on Sunday morning.

The House inquiry began after reports surfaced about Trump's request to the Ukrainian president, which came days after Trump decided to withhold military aid from Ukraine. 

The president has criticized Schiff because of his leading role in the investigation and Romney for saying what Trump did was "wrong and appalling."