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Jordan says he thinks trial will be over by next week

Jordan says he thinks trial will be over by next week
© Greg Nash

Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanSunday shows preview: Trump, Biden gear up for final sprint to Election Day McCarthy faces pushback from anxious Republicans over interview comments McCarthy: 'I would think I already have the votes' to remain as House GOP leader MORE (R-Ohio), one of the members of Trump’s legal defense team, said he thinks the Senate impeachment trial will wrap up by late next week and that senators will go for a vote without witness testimony. 

On an appearance on Fox News Friday morning, Jordan said he believes the Democrats won’t be able to convince the GOP-controlled Senate to bring in witnesses, meaning the trial will last only until Trump’s defense team is done making their case, which will likely be late next week. 

“I feel real confident that hopefully next week we’ll get this decision and get this thing over with it and get on to the business of the American people,” Jordan said. “When you have [Democrats] talking for this long and not seeming to move anyone, the American people don’t seem to be tuning into this as much as we might have anticipated, I think it looks good for the president."

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Jordan, a member of the House Intelligence and House Judiciary committees, was one of the president’s fiercest defenders during the House impeachment hearings. Both he and Rep. John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeHillicon Valley: Treasury sanctions Russian group accused of targeting critical facilities | Appeals court rules Uber, Lyft must comply with labor laws | Biden: Countries that target US elections will 'pay a price' Treasury sanctions Russian group accused of targeting US critical facilities with destructive malware Biden: Countries that interfere in US elections will 'pay a price' MORE (R-Texas), who also serves on both committees, were recruited to Trump’s legal defense team when proceedings moved to the upper chamber.

Democrats have been advocating for calling in new witnesses central to the July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky since the House impeachment hearings. The White House has denied several subpoenas from Congress, and earlier Friday, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP clears key hurdle on Barrett's Supreme Court nomination, setting up Monday confirmation Texas and North Carolina: Democrats on the verge? Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE (R-Texas) said calling in other witnesses would “substantially prolong” the trial

Jordan said if Democrats decide to bring in witnesses, the whistleblower whose complaint about the Ukraine call sparked the impeachment inquiry should testify too, a talking point Jordan and other Republicans have maintained since the House hearings. 

“If they’re going to go down this road — I hope they don’t, but if they do, if Democrats insist on witnesses and they get a few Republicans to vote with them — I don’t think that’s going to happen, but if they go down that road, you have to go all the way down it and whistleblower should come and testify,” Jordan said.  “I don’t think they should, I don’t think that will happen.”

However, questions still remain about whether certain moderate Republicans like Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Trump autographs pumpkin at Maine campaign event: 'It'll be on eBay tonight' Trump makes rare campaign stops in New England in closing stretch MORE (Maine) and Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiGOP clears key hurdle on Barrett's Supreme Court nomination, setting up Monday confirmation Senators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session Murkowski says she will vote to confirm Barrett to Supreme Court on Monday MORE (Alaska) will vote to call additional witnesses to the trial. Collins in particular has received attention recently as her actions during this impeachment trial have made headlines in the media. 

The Maine senator has said in the past in a statement that she would be open to voting to call witnesses, though she has not indicated one way or another her definitive decision.