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Scarborough questions whether Warren, Klobuchar should drop out 'to help consolidate efforts' against Sanders

MSNBC's Joe ScarboroughCharles (Joe) Joseph ScarboroughSacking the Capitol proves free speech is in trouble Scarborough calls for arrest of Trump, Giuliani and Trump Jr. for insurrection against US Sean Penn jokes Russians hacked his hair in viral 'Morning Joe' appearance MORE on Monday questioned whether Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPorter loses seat on House panel overseeing financial sector OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Nine, including former Michigan governor, charged over Flint water crisis | Regulator finalizes rule forcing banks to serve oil, gun companies | Trump admin adds hurdle to increase efficiency standards for furnaces, water heaters DeVos mulled unilateral student loan forgiveness as COVID-19 wracked economy: memo MORE (D-Mass.) should drop out of the Democratic presidential race, noting that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenate Democrats leery of nixing filibuster 'Almost Heaven, West Virginia' — Joe Manchin and a 50-50 Senate Biden to seek minimum wage in COVID-19 proposal MORE (I-Vt.) is building a lead as other candidates stay in the contest but fail to build substantial support. 

Scarborough spoke of increased chatter that Warren and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharGoogle completes Fitbit acquisition Hillicon Valley: Fringe social networks boosted after Capitol attack | Planned protests spark fears of violence in Trump's final days | Election security efforts likely to gain ground in Democrat-controlled Congress US Chamber of Commerce to stop supporting some lawmakers following the Capitol riots MORE (D-Minn.) might need to drop out to "consolidate efforts against Bernie Sanders." 

Warren is in fourth place in Nevada's caucuses, which took place over the weekend, while Klobuchar is now in sixth place. 

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"People are talking about how as well as she’s done, as good of a campaign she’s run, it is time for her to get out of the race," Scarborough said of Klobuchar before pivoting to Warren. "A lot of people starting to talk about Elizabeth Warren, who finished weak again."

"She finished in fourth place in her neighboring home state where she was supposed to win in New Hampshire last week. This week another disappointing finish. She’s maybe in single digits. She’s up to 10 percent now, but she’s in single digits in most of these counts," he said. 

"Is it time for Elizabeth Warren? If she keeps finishing in fourth, fifth place, is it time to her to get out of the race to help consolidate efforts against Bernie Sanders? That’s what a lot of buzz on Twitter suggesting that’s the case," Scarborough concluded.

Sanders easily won the Nevada caucuses over the weekend, receiving 47.2 percent of the vote with 87 percent of precincts reporting. Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMissouri woman seen with Pelosi sign charged in connection with Capitol riots Facebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP MORE followed with 21 percent, and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegOn The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits Buttigieg confirmation hearing slated for Thursday James Murdoch predicts 'a reckoning' for media after Capitol riot MORE had 13.7 percent.

Sanders also led a CBS News–YouGov national poll released on Sunday with 28 percent support, compared to Warren at 19 percent. Biden is at 17 percent in the same poll, followed by former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergBiden selects Gina Raimondo for Commerce chief: reports 7 surprise moments from a tumultuous year in politics NFL, politics dominate 2020 ratings MORE and Buttigieg, who come in with 13 and 10 percent support, respectively. Klobuchar is sixth in the poll at 5 percent support.

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The Sanders campaign and some supporters have accused MSNBC of being biased against the senator.

Over the weekend, Chris Matthews came under intense criticism after comparing Sanders's decisive win in the Nevada caucuses to the Nazi invasion of France in 1940, with some on social media calling for the "Hardball" host to resign.

"I was reading last night about the fall of France in the summer of 1940," Matthews said during MSNBC's live coverage of the caucuses on Saturday. "And the general, Reynaud, calls up Churchill and says, 'It's over.' And Churchill says, 'How can that be? You've got the greatest army in Europe. How can it be over?' He said, 'It's over.'"

Criticism quickly poured in on social media over Matthews using the analogy as it pertains to Sanders, who is Jewish. Most of Sanders's family members were killed in the Holocaust.

Included in the responses was Mike Casca, who serves as Sanders's 2020 communications director.

Updated at 4:42 p.m.