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Trump rips NY Times for altering coronavirus negotiations headline 'to satisfy the radical left'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Trump looks to shore up support in Nebraska NYT: Trump had 7 million in debt mostly tied to Chicago project forgiven MORE ripped The New York Times on Monday for repeatedly changing a headline on an article regarding a trillion-dollar coronavirus relief package "to satisfy the radical left," calling the modifications "corrupt" and "dangerous" for the U.S.

"The New York Times changed headlines 3 times in order to satisfy the Radical Left. What should have been a good story got 'worse & worse', until the headline alone made it very unfair," the president tweeted. "Fake & Corrupt News that is very dangerous for our Country!"

Trump's ire came after the Times changed the original headline on an article, "Democrats Block Action on $1.8 Trillion Stimulus," to "Democrats Block Action on Stimulus Plan, Seeking Worker Protections" and then to "Partisan Divide Threatens Deal on Rescue Plan." The coronavirus stimulus package, which is designed to help offset potentially catastrophic economic impacts of the virus, is still being negotiated after Senate Democrats blocked a procedural vote on the measure late Sunday.

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The Times was already under fire for the changes, primarily from the president's supporters, before the tweet.

The Hill has reached out to the Times for comment.

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Trump late Sunday also lashed out at the Times and other news outlets over their coverage of his administration's response to the coronavirus outbreak, claiming that all he's seen is "hatred of me."

"I watch and listen to the Fake News, CNN, MSDNC, ABC, NBC, CBS, some of FOX (desperately & foolishly pleading to be politically correct), the [New York Times], & the [Washington Post], and all I see is hatred of me at any cost," Trump said on Twitter.

"Don’t they understand that they are destroying themselves?" he asked.

Coronavirus cases have soared in the U.S. to more than 35,000, and the death toll stands at more than 470, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.