Tucker Carlson: Biden won't be the Democratic nominee, Andrew Cuomo 'most likely'

Tucker CarlsonTucker CarlsonEx-Pence aide: Trump spent 45 minutes of task force meeting 'going off on Tucker Carlson' instead of talking coronavirus Biden town hall draws 3.3 million viewers for CNN OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Cheney asks DOJ to probe environmental groups | Kudlow: 'No sector worse hurt than energy' during pandemic | Trump pledges 'no politics' in Pebble Mine review MORE says he believes Joe BidenJoe BidenJoe Biden looks to expand election battleground into Trump country Trump puts Supreme Court fight at center of Ohio rally Special counsel investigating DeVos for potential Hatch Act violation: report MORE "will not be the Democratic nominee on Election Day," with the Fox News host offering New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) as the candidate to take on President TrumpDonald John TrumpBubba Wallace to be driver of Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin NASCAR team Graham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election Southwest Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid MORE in November.

“Well, the math doesn’t work, but it’s not about math. It’s about will,” the conservative Carlson said during Charlie LeDuff’s podcast “No BS News Hour” when asked how the delegate math would work with the former vice president out in front of Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersJacobin editor: Primarying Schumer would force him to fight Trump's SCOTUS nominee Trump campaign plays up Biden's skills ahead of Cleveland debate: 'He's actually quite good' Young voters backing Biden by 2:1 margin: poll MORE (I-Vt.) by a 1,237-914 margin. 

"So the Democratic Party is intent on taking power, period, period, and they mean it, and they’re willing to do kind of whatever they think works," he continued. "I mean that’s demonstrable."
 
“He shouldn’t be working still,” Carlson added of Biden. “I’m not being mean. I know him. I’ve always liked him. But that’s true. And so those are two trains traveling toward each other at high speed, two competing imperatives. We’ve got to win, but we’ve got a guy who can’t win. Therefore, they’re gonna replace him."

“This is not the guy I’ve known, and you can ask anybody who knows him or has watched him,” he continued. “This is not him. He’s a completely different person, and he’s in decline, and I feel bad about it. That’ll be me someday. ... I hope somebody loves me enough to not let me run for president.”

Carlson proceeded to say who could replace the 77-year-old candidate at the top of the Democratic ticket. 

“If I had to bet, I would think Andrew Cuomo would be the most likely to replace Biden,” he said. 
 
Cuomo has received mostly high marks for his handling of the coronavirus epidemic in New York while drawing daily national attention for his detailed briefings outlining the daunting task his state is facing as the epicenter of the crisis. 
 
The conversation proceeded to discuss the chaotic 1968 Democratic convention, which was marred by violent protests and Hubert Humphrey being named the party nominee despite not winning a single primary. 
 
Humphrey went on to lose to Republican Richard Nixon 301-191 in the Electoral College.