SPONSORED:

Associated Press writer Anick Jesdanun dies of coronavirus

Associated Press writer Anick Jesdanun dies of coronavirus
© Getty Images

Long-time writer and deputy technology editor for The Associated Press, Anick Jesdanun, died from complications related to the coronavirus Thursday night in New York City.

Jesdanun, 51, worked for more than two decades, reporting on technological advancements in society and aiding his readers' understanding of the changing world around them, according to the AP.

ADVERTISEMENT

Outside of his work life, Jesdanun was prolific and adventurous, seeking to accomplish goals such as running a marathon on every continent including Antarctica. He completed 83 marathons throughout his life.

Colleagues cited Jesdanun — also known as Nick — as having a knack for covering all of his facts before sending articles out for millions of people to read.

"Before people knew the internet was full of falsehoods, he was the guy who said, `We'd better check that,'" said his colleague, AP technology writer Michael Liedtke.

The AP was the only employer Jesdanun ever worked for, and he had a long-standing history of enriching his colleagues and peers with an unmatched "depth of knowledge," his boss, technology editor David Hamilton, said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jesdanun was also the first AP reporter granted the title of "internet writer" two decades ago, with some of his early work focusing on how the internet would change everything in people's daily lives.

Frank Bajak, AP's first technology editor, said Jesdanun "was the steady bulwark of AP's tech team for two decades."

"He had the deepest institutional memory of AP's tech coverage and patiently educated dozens of novice colleagues in all things digital," Bajak said.

Jesdanun is survived by his parents, Adisak and Orabhin Jesdanun; a brother, Gary Jesdanun; and three nieces and several cousins, AP reported.

The AP is working on logistics to host a virtual memorial service for Jesdanun's friends, family, and colleagues to honor his life and remember the publication's "first internet writer."

"Nick was a kind and gentle colleague who was deeply admired by everyone he worked with," said AP deputy managing editor Sarah Nordgren. "He loved the AP and his work, and it showed every day."