Trump tears into '60 Minutes' after segment with whistleblower Bright

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Barr says he didn't give 'tactical' command to clear Lafayette protesters MORE took aim at CBS News and its flagship news magazine program, "60 Minutes," on Sunday after the program interviewed whistleblower Rick Bright, former head of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority.

In a tweet, the president excoriated CBS and its "third place anchor, @NorahODonnell," whom he accused of "doing everything in their power to demean our Country, much to the benefit of the Radical Left Democrats."

"Tonight they put on yet another Fake 'Whistleblower', a disgruntled employee who supports Dems, fabricates stories & spews lies. @60Minutes report was incorrect, which they couldn’t care less about. Fake News!" he tweeted.

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"This whole Whistleblower racket needs to be looked at very closely, it is causing great injustice & harm. I hope you are listening @SenSusanCollins I also hope that Shari Redstone will take a look at her poorly performing gang. She knows how to make things right!" Trump added, tagging Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Murkowski, Mattis criticism ratchets up pressure on GOP over Trump| Esper orders hundreds of active-duty troops outside DC sent home day after reversal | Iran releases US Navy veteran Michael White Murkowski, Mattis criticism ratchets up pressure on GOP over Trump GOP Sen. Murkowski 'struggling' with whether to vote for Trump MORE (R-Maine). Redstone is the chairwoman of ViacomCBS.

The Hill has reached out to CBS News for comment.

Bright, who last week slammed the Trump administration's response to the COVID-19 crisis during testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee, told CBS News that he was not "disgruntled," as Trump has described him, but instead was frustrated with the administration's response to the virus threat.

"Remember, the entire leadership was focused on containment. There was a belief that we could contain this virus and keep it out of the United States," he said. "Containment doesn't work. Containment does buy time. It could slow. It very well could slow the spread. But while you're slowing the spread, you better be doing something in parallel to be prepared for when that virus breaks out. That was my job."

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"I am not disgruntled," Bright added. "I am frustrated at a lack of leadership. I am frustrated at a lack of urgency to get a head start on developing lifesaving tools for Americans. I'm frustrated at our inability to be heard as scientists. Those things frustrate me."

Bright told the House committee last week that “unprecedented illness and fatalities” would occur if the U.S. coronavirus response does not improve in upcoming months, and he cast doubt on predictions that the U.S. would see a COVID-19 vaccine developed in the next year and a half.

"I still think 12 to 18 months is an aggressive schedule and it’s going to take longer than that to do so," he said on Thursday.