Trump nominee to be Air Force chief of staff says he navigates 'two worlds' as an African American man

Trump nominee to be Air Force chief of staff says he navigates 'two worlds' as an African American man
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Gen. Charles Brown, commander of Pacific Air Forces and President Trump's nominee to be the next Air Force chief of staff, said in a video released Friday that he navigates "two worlds" as an African American and that he's "thinking about how I can make improvements" institutionally.

"As the commander of Pacific Air Forces, a senior leader in our Air Force, and an African American, many of you may be wondering what I'm thinking about the current events surrounding the tragic death of George Floyd," Brown said.

The general said he has been thinking about living in "two worlds, each with their own perspective and views."

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"I'm thinking about how my nomination provides some hope, but also comes with a heavy burden. I can't fix centuries of racism in our country, nor can I fix decades of discrimination that may have impacted members of our Air Force," he said.

Brown said he is thinking about how he can make improvements both "personally, professionally, and institutionally," so that current and future airmen "appreciate the value of diversity."

He concluded his monologue by asking viewers, "I wonder what you're thinking about?"

"I want to hear what you're thinking about, and how together, we can make a difference," Brown said.

Trump nominated Brown in March to be the next Air Force chief of staff. The Senate Armed Services Committee advanced his nomination after he appeared before the panel in May, but his nomination was reportedly held up by a senator. That legislative hold has since reportedly been released.

If confirmed, Brown would become the first African American to sit on the Joint Chiefs of Staff since Colin PowellColin Luther PowellJuan Williams: Time for boldness from Biden Trump's tough talk on China sparks fears of geopolitical crisis Looking forward to pro sports after COVID blackout MORE, who was chairman from 1989 to 1993.