SPONSORED:

Chris Wallace: Kamala Harris 'not far to the left despite what Republicans are gonna try to say'

"Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceSunday shows - Biden foreign policy in focus Pompeo defends Trump on Russia in Chris Wallace interview Lewandowski says Trump has not spoken to him about being reinstated MORE on Wednesday said Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden signs Juneteenth bill: 'Great nations don't ignore their most painful moments' Biden's plan for Central American kids is no substitute for asylum State Department bans Guatemalan lawmaker from entering US MORE (D-Calif.) is "a reasonably safe choice" for Democrats, adding that the presumptive vice presidential nominee isn't very far to the left on the political spectrum.

"She is not far to the left, despite what Republicans are gonna try to say," Wallace told "America's Newsroom."

His comments come a day after former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report OVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic Poll: Majority back blanket student loan forgiveness MORE chose Harris as his running mate. After Biden's announcement, President TrumpDonald TrumpChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report Kim says North Korea needs to be 'prepared' for 'confrontation' with US Ex-Colorado GOP chair accused of stealing more than 0K from pro-Trump PAC MORE said Harris was his No. 1 pick.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Despite the president saying yesterday that Kamala Harris was his No. 1 draft pick, that she’s the one he wanted the most, I promise you that there were a lot of people he would have liked to be running against much more," Wallace said.

Other contenders on Biden's VP shortlist included Obama national security adviser Susan Rice, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  Schumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthTaiwan reports incursion by dozens of Chinese warplanes Concerns grow over China's Taiwan plans China conducts amphibious landing drill near Taiwan after senators' visit MORE (D-Ill.) and Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassBlack Republican advocates his case for CBC membership Tim Scott: Could be 'very hard' to reach police reform deal by June deadline Police reform negotiations enter crucial stretch MORE (D-Calif.).

Harris was seen as a top contender for the Democratic presidential nomination when she kicked off her White House bid in early 2019. But her campaign failed to gain traction, with the California senator dropping out before 2020 as polls showed her far behind Biden, Warren and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  MORE (I-Vt.).

“She did not do very well in the Democratic primaries for a variety of reasons. She didn’t run a great campaign,” Wallace said.

But he said she's likely to energize voters as Biden's running mate.

ADVERTISEMENT

“She adds some excitement to the ticket. She’s a statement to African Americans and especially to African American women, who are the real solid core of the Democratic Party, that the party does not take them for granted," the veteran newsman added.

The Trump campaign launched its first ad against Harris shortly after Tuesday's announcement.

The ad slams Harris for positions she took during her presidential campaign, including her temporary support for "Medicare for All" and advocacy for police reform.

"Voters rejected Harris. They smartly spotted a phony," a narrator says in the ad, which the president tweeted to his more than 85 million followers. "But not Joe Biden. He’s not that smart. He’s called himself a transition candidate."