Kirstie Alley rips new Oscar diversity standards: 'OSCAR ORWELL' marks 'disgrace to artists everywhere'

Actress Kirstie Alley is criticizing new requirements by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for the Oscars that encourage "equitable representation on and off screen," calling it a "disgrace to artists everywhere."

Alley, the former "Cheers" star, dubbed the Academy Awards "OSCAR ORWELL" in reference to "1984" author George Orwell. She later deleted the tweet.

“This is a disgrace to artists everywhere," Alley wrote. "Can you imagine telling Picasso what had to be in his f**king paintings. You people have lost your minds. Control artists, control individual thought .. OSCAR ORWELL.”

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Alley later clarified her statement on Wednesday, calling her original Orwell reference "a poor analogy."

"I deleted my first tweet about the new rules for best movie OSCARS because I feel it was a poor analogy & misrepresented my viewpoint," the 69-year-old "Look Who's Talking" actress wrote. "I am 100% behind diversity inclusion & tolerance. I’m opposed to MANDATED ARBITRARY percentages relating to hiring human beings in any business."

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The Academy on Tuesday announced the films that want to compete for the best picture award will need to meet inclusion targets in front of and/or behind the camera.

One of the new standards a film could use for qualification includes that a lead or supporting actor be a member of an underrepresented racial or ethnic group, including Asian, Hispanic, Black, Indigenous, Native American, Middle Eastern, North African, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander.

Alternatively, a film would need to show that 30 percent of all actors in secondary or minor roles are members of certain categories, including women, LGBTQ people, or those with physical or cognitive disabilities. Another alternative is if the storyline involves an underrepresented group.

The changes come five years after the #OscarsSoWhite controversy, when a lack of diversity among the nominees captured headlines and trended on social media.