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Tucker Carlson: Climate change is 'systemic racism in the sky'

Fox News host Tucker CarlsonTucker CarlsonCable news October ratings explode as Fox News hits historic highs Trump aide accuses CNN's Chris Cuomo of breaking quarantine while COVID-19 positive in heated interview Tucker Carlson to interview Hunter Biden business partner and discuss 'new allegations' MORE on Friday compared warnings about climate change to “systemic racism in the sky” while reporting on the ongoing wildfires on the West Coast.

In a segment on “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” the host claimed Democratic leaders were blaming climate change for starting the wildfires in an attempt to secure votes in the upcoming elections. 

"Climate change, they said, caused these fires. They didn't explain how exactly that happened. How did climate change do that?" Carlson asked. "In the hands of Democratic politicians, climate change is like systemic racism in the sky. You can't see it, but rest assured it's everywhere and it's deadly."

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“And like systemic racism, it is your fault,” Carlson continued. “The American middle class did it. They caused climate change. They ate too many hamburgers. They drove too many SUVs. They had too many children.” 

In another clip from the segment, Carlson claimed there is “no evidence” linking climate change to the severity of the wildfires.

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The comments come a year after Carlson called the Climate Strike, in which students around the world skipped school and organized demonstrations to support combating climate change, a “coordinated left-wing political protest.” He also compared the climate change movement to Mao’s Great Leap Forward, saying, "And there you have the modern left's climate agenda: no drinking straws, no automobiles, no airplanes, no meat, no democracy."

Despite Carlson’s doubt that climate change has led to especially intense fires on the West Coast, fire experts have said that changing global temperatures and recent weather patterns have created conditions for 2020’s fire season to be longer and more explosive than usual. 

“When we have really warm dry summers, more of our landscapes on both sides of the mountains have a lot of those available fuels, so they’re primed for a fire,” Susan Prichard, a fire ecologist at the University of Washington, told The Hill on Thursday. “With climate change, with warmer drier summers and longer associated fire seasons, we’ve just got more opportunities” for large fires.