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Video of Lindsey Graham arguing against nominating a Supreme Court justice in an election year goes viral

A 2016 video of Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP lawmaker 'encouraged' by Biden's Afghanistan strategy Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Graham: 'A full withdrawal from Afghanistan is dumber than dirt and devilishly dangerous' MORE (R-S.C) saying the Supreme Court should never be filled in an election year went viral this weekend following the death of Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgProgressives give Biden's court reform panel mixed reviews Biden will let Breyer decide when to retire, aide says Biden establishes commission to study expanding Supreme Court MORE.

At the time, the senator said he was against picking a justice right before a presidential election, stating that if then-candidate Donald Trump or Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) were president and a vacancy were left at the end of the their first term, the choice should be left to the winner of the next election. 

"I want you to use my words against me. If there's a Republican president in 2016 and a vacancy occurs in the last year of the first term, you can say Lindsey Graham said let's let the next president, whoever it might be, make that nomination," he said four years ago when arguing against then-President Obama's nomination of Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandBudget tasks DOJ with turnaround of policing, voting rights, hate crimes Progressive group ramps up pressure on Justice Breyer to retire The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE.

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Graham's prior statement contradicts his swift jump to support President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to move ahead with billion UAE weapons sale approved by Trump Fox News hires high-profile defense team in Dominion defamation lawsuit Associate indicted in Gaetz scandal cooperating with DOJ: report MORE's goal to approve a nominee for Ginsburg's spot this year.

"In light of these two events, I will support President @realDonaldTrump in any effort to move forward regarding the recent vacancy created by the passing of Justice Ginsburg," Graham penned on Saturday, as Democrats such as Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerHolder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ Capitol Police officer killed in car attack lies in honor in Capitol Rotunda Rep. Andy Kim on Asian hate: 'I've never felt this level of fear' MORE (N.Y.) and Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzGeorgia law makes it a crime to give food, water to people waiting to vote Senate Democrats reintroduce bill to create financial transaction tax GOP lawmaker introduces bill targeting tech liability protections MORE (Hawaii) called him out over hypocrisy.

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The video of Graham quickly went viral on Saturday, the day after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell seeks to end feud with Trump Senate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Colin Powell on Afghanistan: 'We've done all we can do' MORE (R-Ky.) announced that he would bring President Trump's pick for the Supreme Court vacancy to a vote in the upper chamber.

Democratic strategist Adam Parkhomenko condemned McConnell and Graham for their move to nominate the next justice, saying, "They can lie and be as hypocritical as they want because no reporter they give access to is ever gonna use those words."

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenIRS to roll out payments for ,000 child tax credit in July Capitol Police told not to use most aggressive tactics in riot response, report finds Biden to accompany first lady to appointment for 'common medical procedure' MORE said late Friday the winner of the election should be the decider of the next justice to fill Ginsburg's spot.

"Let me be clear: The voters should pick a President, and that President should select a successor to Justice Ginsburg," he said.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Democrats work to pick up GOP support on anti-Asian hate crimes bill Against mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan MORE (R-Maine) echoed Biden's calls, saying while she has "no objection" on the Senate Judiciary Committee's beginning the process of reviewing the nominee's credentials, she opposes a decision until after Nov. 3.

“Given the proximity of the presidential election ... I do not believe that the Senate should vote on the nominee prior to the election,” Collins said in a letter Saturday.