Biden town hall questioner worked as speechwriter in Obama administration: report

A participant in Thursday night's ABC News town hall with Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenHow 'Buy American', other pro-US policies can help advocates pass ambitious climate policies Overnight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Biden backtracks on Taiwan Photos of the Week: Manchin protestor, Paris Hilton and a mirror room MORE previously worked as a speechwriter in the Obama administration, but was only identified during the televised event as someone who works in "communications," Fox News reported Friday.

The town hall from Philadelphia moderated by George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosAuthor of controversial Trump Russia dossier speaks out: 'I stand by the work we did' Biden giving stiff-arm to press interviews Yellen confident of minimum global corporate tax passage in Congress MORE included a question from Nathan Osburn, who reportedly worked in the Office of Public Affairs and was director of speechwriting for members of President Obama's Cabinet.

The Twitter bio for a Nathan Osburn says he's a former Cabinet speechwriter.

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When reached for comment, an ABC spokesperson told The Hill that Stephanopoulos disclosed the mix of voters at the top of the program when speaking to Biden.

"They're a group of -- some are voting for you, some have said they're voting for President TrumpDonald TrumpHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Twitter's algorithm boosts right-leaning content, internal study finds Ohio Democrat calls Vance an 'ass----' over Baldwin tweet Matt Taibbi says Trump's rhetoric caused public perception of US intelligence services to shift MORE, some are still undecided, and we're going to try to take questions from as many as we can tonight," Stephanopoulos said.

When Osburn was selected to ask a question of Biden, his profession was only shown as "communications." He was introduced by Stephanopoulos only as a "Philadelphia Democrat."

Osburn's question regarded President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettA politicized Supreme Court? That was the point Solid majority believes Supreme Court rulings based more on politics than law  Locked and Loaded: Supreme Court is ready for a showdown on the Second Amendment MORE "being pushed through at the last minute" despite millions already voting and what Osburn argued was "the erosion of rights of LBGTQ Americans."

"Our country's first Supreme Court gave its first ruling just two blocks from here from 1791 to 1800 and it's become more polarized since then. Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandTrustmark Bank to pay million 'redlining' fine The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Manchin, Sanders in budget feud; Biden still upbeat Biden: Comment that DOJ should prosecute those who defy subpoenas 'not appropriate' MORE didn't get a hearing for all of 2016 and Amy Coney Barrett's being pushed through at the last minute even though millions have already voted," Osburn said.

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"So what do you think about ideas from people like Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden's Big Labor policies will create next round of inflation Airlines should give flight attendants 10 hours of rest between flights: FAA GOP memo urges lawmakers to blame White House 'grinches' for Christmas delays MORE and others to put in place safeguards that will help insure more long-term balance and stability? And what do you say to LBGTQ Americans and others who are very worried right now about erosions of their rights and our democracy as a whole?"

During his reply, Biden said he would let voters know what his stance was on expanding the Supreme Court before Election Day.

"Don't voters have a right to know where you stand?" Stephanopoulos asked.

"They do have a right to know where I stand. And they will have a right to know where I stand before they vote," Biden replied.

Updated at 2:43 p.m.