Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year

Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year
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Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Ron Johnson: 'I may not be the best candidate' for 2022 midterms MORE and voting rights advocate Stacey Abrams are among the list of nominees for Time magazine’s Person of the Year distinction for 2020.

The distinction, which the magazine has been giving on an annual basis since the 1920s, is bestowed upon an individual or group the country thinks has had  “the greatest influence on the events of the year—for better or worse.”

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The year has been a significant one historically for Harris and the rest country, which, this month, saw the first Black woman, first woman, and first Asian, win election to office as vice president-elect. 

Abrams, the former 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee for Georgia, also saw widespread attention this year for for her work mobilizing voters in the Peach State. She took the national spotlight earlier this month when President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden authorizes up to 0M for Afghan refugees Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe MORE was projected winner of the state in the presidential race. The instance marked the first time the usually reliably red state voted blue in a presidential race since 1992.

Other nominees for the distinction include Govs. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerReporter: FBI involvement in Whitmer plot similar to sting operations targeting Islamic extremists Former Detroit police chief takes step toward gubernatorial run Whitmer has raised .5 million so far in 2021 MORE (D-Mich.) and Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoAs Biden's America becomes less safe, the violence and crime could cost Democrats New York gun rights case before Supreme Court with massive consequences  New York bans underage marriages, raises age of consent to 18 MORE (D-N.Y.), who have both garnered national headlines throughout the year for their response to the coronavirus pandemic. The list also includes Anthony FauciAnthony FauciGOP Rep. Cawthorn says he wants to 'prosecute' Fauci The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel McConnell pushes vaccines, but GOP muddles his message MORE, the country’s top infectious diseases expert, who helped lead the government’s federal response to the outbreak.

Biden and President TrumpDonald TrumpPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Has Trump beaten the system? MORE also appeared on the list, along with a string of other prominent political figures: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary On The Money: Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' | Frustration builds as infrastructure talks drag MORE (D-N.Y.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHas Trump beaten the system? Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Tokyo Olympics kick off with 2020-style opening ceremony MORE (R-Ky.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia Warren-backed amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to defense bill MORE (D-Mass.) and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

As of Wednesday, Fauci and essential workers are tied with the highest percentage of yeses, with both securing 81 percent. Harris so far has notched 68 percent in yeses and Biden has gotten 64 percent for the same. Black Lives Matters activists have also captured 61 percent in yeses so far while Abrams has secured 59 percent.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misstated how Time's "Person of the Year" is chosen.