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Amy Coney Barrett receives $2 million advance for book deal: report

Amy Coney Barrett receives $2 million advance for book deal: report
© Bonnie Cash

Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettCourt watchers buzz about Breyer's possible retirement Five hot-button issues Biden didn't mention in his address to Congress Conservative justices split in ruling for immigrant fighting deportation MORE has reportedly sold a book, receiving an advance of $2 million.

Three industry sources close to the matter told Politico that Barrett's book will deal with how judges are not supposed to bring their personal feelings into their rulings.

One industry source told Politico that the "eye-raising amount" is likely the most a justice has received since Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasSupreme Court gets it wrong again, denying justice to those in uniform Overnight Defense: Top general drops objection to major change in prosecuting military sexual assault | Supreme Court declines to take up case from former West Point cadet | Pentagon says 'small' attacks not affecting Afghanistan withdrawal Supreme Court declines to hear case over former West Point cadet's rape allegations MORE and Sandra Day O'Connor sold their own books.

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The Hill has reached out to the Supreme Court for comment.

Barrett was pressed by Democratic lawmakers during her confirmation hearing on how she would rule on certain cases having to do with Roe v. Wade, the Second Amendment and the Affordable Care Act. Barrett avoided answering such questions, saying that, like the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgCourt watchers buzz about Breyer's possible retirement Five hot-button issues Biden didn't mention in his address to Congress Schumer waiting for recommendation on Supreme Court expansion MORE, she would not offer "previews" on specific cases.

And during her hearing to be confirmed as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 2017, Barrett commented on her personal beliefs when asked if she considered herself an "orthodox Catholic."

"If you're asking whether I take my faith seriously and I'm a faithful Catholic, I am," Barrett said. "Although I would stress that my personal church affiliation or my religious belief would not bear in the discharge of my duties as a judge."

Industry sources also told Politico that former Attorney General William BarrBill BarrCNN legal analyst joins DOJ's national security division Barr threatened to resign over Trump attempts to fire Wray: report DOJ faces big decision on home confinement MORE had sold a book on his time in the Justice Department.

Barr stepped down as attorney general on Dec. 23 after breaking with then-President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE and telling the media that no evidence of widespread voter fraud had been found.