Amy Coney Barrett receives $2 million advance for book deal: report

Amy Coney Barrett receives $2 million advance for book deal: report
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Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettBiden's Supreme Court choice: A political promise, but also a matter of justice The Hill's Morning Report - Democrats sense opportunity with SCOTUS vacancy Schumer finds unity moment in Supreme Court fight MORE has reportedly sold a book, receiving an advance of $2 million.

Three industry sources close to the matter told Politico that Barrett's book will deal with how judges are not supposed to bring their personal feelings into their rulings.

One industry source told Politico that the "eye-raising amount" is likely the most a justice has received since Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasBiden's Supreme Court choice: A political promise, but also a matter of justice Manchin and Sinema must help Biden make the Supreme Court look more like America The Hill's Morning Report - Who will replace Justice Breyer? MORE and Sandra Day O'Connor sold their own books.

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The Hill has reached out to the Supreme Court for comment.

Barrett was pressed by Democratic lawmakers during her confirmation hearing on how she would rule on certain cases having to do with Roe v. Wade, the Second Amendment and the Affordable Care Act. Barrett avoided answering such questions, saying that, like the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgThe Hill's Morning Report - Democrats sense opportunity with SCOTUS vacancy How President Biden can win back momentum on women's rights Manchin and Sinema must help Biden make the Supreme Court look more like America MORE, she would not offer "previews" on specific cases.

And during her hearing to be confirmed as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 2017, Barrett commented on her personal beliefs when asked if she considered herself an "orthodox Catholic."

"If you're asking whether I take my faith seriously and I'm a faithful Catholic, I am," Barrett said. "Although I would stress that my personal church affiliation or my religious belief would not bear in the discharge of my duties as a judge."

Industry sources also told Politico that former Attorney General William BarrBill BarrHow President Biden can win back momentum on women's rights Kellyanne Conway memoir set for May release The Hill's Morning Report - US warns Kremlin, weighs more troops to Europe MORE had sold a book on his time in the Justice Department.

Barr stepped down as attorney general on Dec. 23 after breaking with then-President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer chairman of Wisconsin GOP party signals he will comply with Jan. 6 committee subpoena Overnight Defense & National Security — Pentagon tells Russia to stand down Billionaire GOP donor maxed out to Manchin following his Build Back Better opposition MORE and telling the media that no evidence of widespread voter fraud had been found.