Marshall Project founder stepping down as chair

Marshall Project founder stepping down as chair
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The Marshall Project, the Pulitzer Prize-winning nonprofit criminal justice-focused news organization, announced on Thursday that its founder Neil Barsky will be stepping down as board chairman.

“I founded The Marshall Project with the belief that journalism, done honestly and well, has infinite power to drive change,” Barsky said in an announcement.

Liz Simons, co-founder of the Heising-Simons Foundation, an organization focused on the climate, early education, science and human rights, was named as Barsky's successor.

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“I am extremely gratified by all we’ve achieved, and am particularly proud that with new chair Liz Simons, Susan Chira as editor-in-chief and Carroll Bogert as president, we have successfully passed the baton to a new generation of leaders. We are in superb hands," Barsky added.

The Marshall Project was founded in 2015 and has since won two Pulitzers, including this summer for a collaboration with AL.com, IndyStar and Invisible Institute that investigated the injuries caused by police dogs.

Prior to founding the organization, Barsky worked as a journalist for The Wall Street Journal and New York Daily News. He also worked in finance as the founder of the Midtown Capital and Alson Capital Partners hedge funds.

According to The New York Times, Barsky's next endeavor will be running a new investment venture that will support female and minority asset managers. He said part of his decision to leave was the feeling of being “mildly constrained” due to remaining impartial and nonpartisan as the leader of a newsroom. He told the Times that he wanted to be more outspoken on policy matters.

“Neil Barsky has left an indelible mark on both nonprofit journalism and criminal justice reform, creating an institution with integrity and lasting impact,” Simons said, adding that she is "honored to follow in his footsteps and lead the Board of The Marshall Project at this urgent moment in the national conversation on policing and justice.”

—Updated Friday at 5:19 p.m.