Media

Soros group pushes back on Tucker Carlson documentary

The Open Society Foundations, a group founded by George Soros, is pushing back on a recent documentary by Tucker Carlson taking aim at Soros and his relationship with his homeland of Hungary, The Washington Post reports.

Carlson’s “Hungary vs. Soros: The Fight for Civilization,” which was created for the Fox Nation streaming service, pits Soros against Hungarian right-wing prime minister Viktor Orbán.

Carlson says that Soros, a liberal billionaire whose Open Society Foundations says it aims to improve democracies and make governments accountable, “is waging a kind of war — political, social and demographic war — on the West.”

The Fox host asserts that the group is “trying to eliminate national borders, to oust democratically elected leaders, and install ideologically aligned puppets into positions of power.”

Open Society Vice President Laura Silber told the Post that Soros and his group “have worked for more than 30 years to support vibrant and inclusive democracies whose governments are accountable to the people they serve.”

“Mr. Carlson appears to prefer authoritarian rule, state capture of media and the courts, crony corruption and rigged elections,” she said.

Carlson defended the documentary episode during his Fox News show on Thursday night, saying Soros and Orban have been at “loggerheads for years.”

“And so we thought that was interesting enough, enough of a metaphor for the struggle that is going on globally between nationalists and people who oppose them. We thought it was worthy of our season finale documentary for our series Tucker Carlson Originals,” he said.

He also responded to pushback, saying, “You have a right to know exactly what George Soros is doing to this country and to other countries around the world and we think we have an obligation to tell you, so we are going to continue to.”

Carlson praises Orbán in the documentary for his political efforts to incentivize family growth and for his “normal” lifestyle.

“Orbán has been in politics for 30 years, but he seems surprisingly normal,” Carlson says in the documentary. “He often drives himself to work. He has dinner in Budapest without security. Every Thursday, he spends the day reading.”

Orbán became prime minister of Hungary in 2010 and has a legacy of hard-line anti-immigration stances, for which he was praised by former President Trump.

Updated: 3 p.m.

Media