The Hill's Morning Report: As Trump talks, his lawyers sweat

The Hill's Morning Report: Trump's TV talk and legal trouble | Summit leads to historic pact between the Koreas | Ryan's role in House chaplain exit | What next for the VA? | Tester in Trump's crosshairs  | Pruitt's hot seat | Merkel meets with POTUS | Menendez admonished by ethics panel | Unlocking JFK assassination files 

 

Welcome to The Hill's Morning Report, and thank goodness it's Friday! This daily email, a successor to The Hill's Tipsheet, is reported by Jonathan Easley and Alexis Simendinger to get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch.  (CLICK HERE to subscribe!)

 
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*** BREAKING OVERNIGHT *** North and South Korea agreed to work to remove all nuclear weapons from the Korean Peninsula and, by this year, to declare an official end to the Korean War. ***

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But first ... President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE's freewheeling cable news interviews are great television. They're also a nightmare for his lawyers.

In a wide-ranging, 30-minute interview on "Fox & Friends" yesterday, the president created more than a "tiny fraction" of new headaches for his legal team.

The bottom line: When Trump vents about the various legal cases and lawsuits around him, it adds oxygen to the fire. Stormy Daniels's media-savvy attorney Michael Avenatti immediately hit the cable news circuit, where he called the Fox interview "hugely damaging" for the president and "beyond stupid."

Attorney Alan Dershowitz, pointing to the president's comments about the Justice Department and Daniels' lawsuit, agreed.

"This particular president speaks in a way that sends conflicting messages throughout," he told CNN, "and I wish as an American citizen he wouldn't speak in this way. And if I were his lawyer, which I am not, I would advise him not to speak in this way."

What the president said: 

  • Trump says his personal attorney Michael Cohen "represents" him in the case with Daniels, who accepted $130,000 from Cohen in exchange for her silence about allegations of an affair with the president.

Why it matters: 

  • Trump denies the affair and recently said he had no knowledge of the payment.
  • Federal investigators are believed to be looking into whether the payment violates campaign finance or other laws. Cohen will plead the Fifth on the matter.

Trump said: 

  • Cohen handles only "a tiny, tiny little fraction" of "my overall legal work."

Why it matters:

  • The president's legal representatives and Cohen's lawyers argued in a New York court that much of what the FBI seized was protected by attorney-client privilege.
  • Wasting no time, the government in a filing yesterday argued that Trump's remarks on "Fox & Friends" bolster its argument that "the seized materials are unlikely to contain voluminous privileged documents."

Former U.S. attorney John Wood tells us:

"Any time a lawyer's client speaks publicly and it's not completely scripted, the lawyers are nervous. Any lawyer will want to make sure his or her client is well-scripted before going public. That's tough to do, I guess, when your client is the president and he's interacting off-the-cuff with press all the time."

We took this to Trump's former attorney John Dowd, who responded: "Tell it to his lawyers."

Just in: Trump returned to the investigations this morning, attacking former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyComey tweets: 'We always emerge stronger from hard times' Trump to declassify controversial text messages, documents related to Russia probe Lisa Page bombshell: FBI couldn’t prove Trump-Russia collusion before Mueller appointment MORE over Twitter. 

The Hill: Special master named to review materials in Cohen case for instances of privilege.

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Meanwhile, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved legislation yesterday to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify McConnell rips Democrats for handling of Kavanaugh nomination Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (R-Ky.) will not bring the bill to the floor, but the measure is a warning from Republicans who say they worry the president might move to shut Mueller down.

The Associated Press: Trump pledges hands-off Russia probe; but "may change my mind."

Poll: Majority of Republicans don't want Trump to fire Mueller.

Reuters: Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill’s 12:30 Report — Kavanaugh accuser willing to testify | Kavanaugh denies allegations, says he’s willing to testify | 50 days from the midterms Ken Starr backs Mueller, says president 'must be held accountable' The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE says Mueller probe has taken on a "life of its own."

 

LEADING THE DAY

House chaplain

A bizarre tale from Capitol Hill …

Hands down, the story of the day goes to The Hill's Melanie Zanona and Mike Lillis, with assists from Juliegrace Brufke and Scott Wong. Our colleagues report that outgoing Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPelosi calls on Ryan to bring long-term Violence Against Women Act to floor Juan Williams: America warms up to socialism Jordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker MORE (R-Wis.) has forced out House chaplain Patrick Conroy for unexplained reasons perceived as political.

The Speaker's office says House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiPelosi calls on Ryan to bring long-term Violence Against Women Act to floor Dems' confidence swells with midterms fast approaching GOP: The economy will shield us from blue wave MORE (D-Calif.) signed off on Conroy's forced resignation, but Pelosi's office is disputing that claim. Lawmakers on both sides are furious and demanding answers from Ryan.

VA nominee

With Dr. Ronny Jackson's withdrawal from Cabinet contention and return to the White House medical office, Trump began a new search for a Veterans Affairs secretary. He says he wants someone with "political capability."

    > Watch for extreme vetting ahead.

Washington Examiner: Trump considering former House Veterans' Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Jeff MillerJefferson (Jeff) Bingham MillerThis Labor Day, let's remember the contributions of our vets VA's wrongful denial of sexual trauma cases shows that the agency still needs an overhaul It's difficult, but not impossible, to legislate the toxic VA culture MORE for VA.

The Hill: Senators hope Trump's next VA pick will be less controversial.

Veterans advocacy groups are apoplectic about the vacancy.

"Our veterans are simply looking for a competent, proven and dynamic leader with integrity," says the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America organization. "We now face the prospect of a stunning eighth nominee for VA secretary since 9/11. ... It's been an unprecedented time of chaos, political agendas and uncertainty. And millions of veterans and their families have paid the price."

The IAVA membership never warmed to Jackson as Trump's choice. In a recent internal survey, members said they want the next candidate to be an expert on health care with military and management experience.

State Department

By a vote of 57-42, the Senate confirmed Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Air Force outlines plan for biggest force since end of Cold War | Trump admin slashes refugee cap | Mattis accuses Russia of meddling in Macedonia's NATO bid Hillicon Valley: Elon Musk sued by diver from Thai cave rescue | Researchers find new malware family | FEMA delays new presidential alert test Trump administration to cut refugee admissions to 30K for 2019 MORE to be the next secretary of State. The former Kansas congressman and ex-CIA director was sworn in and got right to work, arriving overnight in Brussels for a NATO summit.

Democratic Sens. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampKavanaugh becomes September surprise for midterm candidates Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (N.D.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinKavanaugh becomes September surprise for midterm candidates Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (W.Va.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyKavanaugh becomes September surprise for midterm candidates Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (Ind.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonJuan Williams: America warms up to socialism Dems gain momentum 50 days before midterms Jeb Bush campaigns with Rick Scott in Florida MORE (Fla.) and Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDems gain momentum 50 days before midterms CBS Poll: Missouri, Montana Senate races in dead heats Dems play waiting game with Collins and Murkowski MORE (Mo.) — who are each up for reelection in states won by Trump in 2016 — joined with Democratic Sen. Doug Jones (Ala.) and Sen. Angus KingAngus Stanley KingRestoring our national parks would be a bipartisan win for Congress Restore our parks Renaming Senate office building after McCain sparks GOP backlash MORE (I-Maine) to support the president's nominee to succeed Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonPompeo working to rebuild ties with US diplomats: report NYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story Rubio defends Haley over curtains story: Example of media pushing bias MORE.

The Hill: Pompeo's confirmation was a setback for liberals.

Politics

Speaking of red-state Senate candidates ... Montana's Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterCBS Poll: Missouri, Montana Senate races in dead heats Dems play waiting game with Collins and Murkowski Watchdog groups to file complaint against Montana candidate alleging coordination with NRA MORE, a Democrat in a state Trump carried by more than 20 points in 2016, is in the news this week.

By virtue of his committee responsibilities, Tester played a pivotal role in upending the Veterans Affairs nominee. The barrel-chested rancher helped bring to light anonymous allegations of drinking and over-prescribing medications, which ultimately doomed Rear Adm. Jackson's Cabinet hopes.

The president made his displeasure clear. 

"I think Jon Tester has to have a big price to pay in Montana because I don't think people in Montana — the admiral is the kind of person that they respect and admire and they don't like seeing what's happened to him," Trump said Thursday on Fox.

Tester is running for his third Senate term, and was among the Democrats who voted against Pompeo to lead the State Department.

He didn't win 50 percent of the vote in his two previous campaigns. This year, a Green Party candidate could make the ballot, potentially siphoning away a critical percentage of votes. And the network of groups associated with billionaire conservative donors Charles and David Koch are swamping the state with ads against the incumbent, known for operating an 1,800-acre ranch while serving in Washington.

The Hill: Tester's moves back to top of GOP's Senate hit list.

More campaign news:

The Hill: House Minority Leader Pelosi warns Democrats impeachment push is a gift to the GOP. 

The Hill: Dems look to keep momentum with upcoming special elections.

Poll: Dems hold double-digit lead in generic ballot.

*** SPOTTED at last night's No Labels event: Reps. Salud CarbajalSalud CarbajalLatinos aren't reaching top military positions, study shows IRS makes it easy for nonprofits to spend dark money in our elections Dems demand answers on Pentagon not recognizing Pride Month MORE (D-Calif.), Jim CostaJames (Jim) Manuel CostaTwitter reverses decision to block GOP candidate from promoting video Dem, GOP groups prepare spending blitz for midterms Religious tensions flare after chaplain's ouster MORE (D-Calif.), Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristFlorida’s lost summers: Toxic algae ‘emergency’ decades in the making Bill Nelson gears up campaigning as he seeks to prove naysayers wrong The Hill's Morning Report: As Trump talks, his lawyers sweat MORE (D-Fla.), Vicente González (D-Texas), Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerDems vow rules overhaul to empower members if House flips Problem Solvers Caucus has a vision: a bipartisan House Bipartisan group of lawmakers seeks rules changes under next Speaker MORE (D-N.J.), Daniel LipinskiDaniel William LipinskiInsurgency shakes up Democratic establishment Holocaust-denying GOP nominee confronts write-in opponent, challenges him to debate Ex-GOP staffer seeks write-in nomination against Nazi candidate in Chicago: report MORE (D-Ill.), Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Cuomo wins and Manafort plea deal Hillicon Valley: North Korean IT firm hit with sanctions | Zuckerberg says Facebook better prepared for midterms | Big win for privacy advocates in Europe | Bezos launches B fund to help children, homeless Bipartisan trio asks US intelligence to investigate ‘deepfakes’ MORE (D-Fla.), Jared PolisJared Schutz PolisInterior moves ahead with opening wildlife refuge next to contaminated nuclear site Environmental group pledges M to help green candidates Overnight Health Care: South Dakota proposes Medicaid work requirements | Senate Republicans sign off on opioids package | GOP targets Manchin over Planned Parenthood MORE (D-Colo.), Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenOvernight Health Care: Opioid legislation passes overwhelmingly | DOJ backs Cigna-Express Scripts merger | Senate passes ban on pharmacy gag clauses Poll: Dean Heller running even against Democratic challenger Dems gain momentum 50 days before midterms MORE (D-Nev.), Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderKavanaugh nomination a make or break moment to repeal Citizens United New Holocaust Museum exhibit challenges us to continue asking hard questions Dem letter calls for rolling back move targeting drug companies MORE (D-Ill.), Darren SotoDarren Michael SotoTrump's Puerto Rico tweets spark backlash Election Countdown: What to watch in final primaries | Dems launch M ad buy for Senate races | Senate seats most likely to flip | Trump slump worries GOP | Koch network's new super PAC Puerto Rico governor vows to support pro-statehood candidates in 2018 MORE (D-Fla), Tom Suozzi (D-N.Y.), Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentGOP House candidate placed on leave from longtime position after sexual misconduct allegation Election handicapper moves GOP leader's race to 'toss-up' The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Pa.), John FasoJohn James Faso'Law & Order: SVU' star wins court case, gets on ballot in NY congressional district Preventing violence isn’t partisan: Time to reauthorize Violence Against Women Act Five things to watch for in New York primaries MORE (R-N.Y.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickCongress prepares to punt biggest political battles until after midterms Preventing violence isn’t partisan: Time to reauthorize Violence Against Women Act Five biggest surprises in midterm fight MORE (R-Pa.), David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceThe Hill's 12:30 Report Bipartisan lawmakers agree — marijuana prohibition has failed and it’s time to change the law Cannabis advocates urge lawmakers to tackle tax provision MORE (R-Ohio), John Katko (R-N.Y.), Leonard LanceLeonard LanceBlue-state Republicans say they will vote against 'tax cuts 2.0' if it extends SALT cap House panels set up to probe indicted GOP Reps. Collins, Hunter Doubts shadow GOP push for tax cuts 2.0 MORE (R-N.J.), Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedJordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker Overnight Health Care: Kavanaugh questioned if Roe v. Wade was 'settled law' in leaked email | Senate to vote next week on opioid package | Officials seek to jail migrant children indefinitely | HHS chief, lawmakers meet over drug prices House Republicans huddle on 'tax cuts 2.0' MORE (R-N.Y.) and Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonGOP: The economy will shield us from blue wave Republicans mull new punishments for dissident lawmakers Key primaries in August will help shape midterms MORE (R-Mich.).***

 

IN FOCUS/SHARP TAKES

➔ Pruitt Watch:

The Hill's Timothy Cama and Miranda Green have takeaways from embattled Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittOvernight Energy: EPA watchdog says agency failed to properly monitor asbestos at schools| Watchdog won’t investigate former Superfund head’s qualifications| Florence causes toxic coal ash spill in North Carolina White House officials discussing potential replacements for FEMA chief: report Trump’s EPA chooses coal over the American people MORE's testimony yesterday (The Hill).

The spotlight was harsh: 

  • The EPA chief read aloud the threats directed at him and his family, which he said explained a hefty personal security detail and expensive travel.
  • Pruitt said the EPA's inspector general supported his explanations through a "threat assessment" report. The IG's office later accused him of misrepresenting its report.
  • Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) told The Hill that Pruitt is a gift to Democrats and "an awesome symbol of corruption" within the Trump administration.

The New York Times: After weeks of tough headlines and allegations of ethical lapses and excessive spending, the administrator's job is described as hanging by a thread.

➔ International News:

North Korea:

Leaders from North Korea and South Korea met for an historic summit in Panmunjom. You can watch the stunning footage of the encounter here and here.

Kim Jong Un: "I came here to put an end to the history of confrontation."

Reuters: Koreas agree to goal of "complete denuclearization."

The Associated Press: Korean leaders avoid specific measures to address nuke crisis.

The president tweeted about the developments on Friday morning. 

The Korean meeting took place amid ongoing negotiations between the U.S. and North Korea about a Trump-Kim summit. The White House released this photo of Pompeo's secret meeting with Kim in April:

Germany:

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at the White House this morning to confer with Trump.

Trump's newly confirmed ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, will be on hand for the meetings, we've learned. Grenell was nominated in September but only confirmed on Thursday. He's the highest-ranking openly gay official ever to serve in a Republican administration.

The Washington Post: The Senate confirms Grenell — a Republican commentator, operative and former aide to new national security adviser John Bolton — despite objections from Democrats.

The Associated Press: Merkel gets much smaller platform on U.S. visit.

The Hill (op-ed): For Trump, the Macron party is over. Merkel will get down to business.

Around the world:

The Wall Street Journal: Classified report slams military over October deaths in Niger.

The Hill: Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense: Air Force outlines plan for biggest force since end of Cold War | Trump admin slashes refugee cap | Mattis accuses Russia of meddling in Macedonia's NATO bid It’s long past time to tie the president’s hands Mattis warns of Russian meddling in Macedonia's bid for NATO: report MORE defends Iran deal as Trump considers withdrawal.

The Hill: Trump will visit the U.K. in July.

Poll: Voters back Trump's handling of Syria air strikes and tensions with North Korea.

➔ A tough day for Democrats on Capitol Hill:

The Hill: The Senate Ethics Committee "severely" admonished Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDems urge tech companies to remove 3D-gun blueprints Dem senators introduce resolution calling on Trump to stop attacking the press Booming economy has Trump taking a well-deserved victory lap MORE (D-N.J.), who is up for reelection this year, saying his relationship with a controversial doctor broke federal law.

The Hill: Progressive groups demand House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) resign.

The Hill: Pelosi defends leadership effort to cull Democratic primary.

 

OPINION

Make or break time for NAFTA negotiations, by Earl Anthony Wayne, former assistant secretary of State for Economic and Business Affairs, opinion contributor with The Hill. https://bit.ly/2r29KgI

How the FBI can move beyond James Comey, by James Gagliano, former FBI special agent, opinion contributor with The Hill. https://bit.ly/2JwcnPw

 

WHERE AND WHEN

The House recesses until May 7.

The Senate begins a 10-day break and returns to the Capitol on May 7.

President Trump speaks during a photo opportunity with a Team USA Celebration. He welcomes Chancellor Merkel to the White House for a meeting and working lunch. The two leaders hold a joint press conference in the afternoon. Later, Trump meets with White House Correspondents' Association journalism scholarship recipients.

Vice President Pence participates in a phone call with the president of Afghanistan in the morning. In the afternoon, he'll attend the working lunch with Merkel and host the 2018 White House Correspondents' Association scholarship winner.

 

ELSEWHERE

> H.R. McMaster and commander: can a national security adviser retain his integrity if the president has none? (The New Yorker)

> The awkward exile of Michael Cohen (The Wall Street Journal).

> Study: Deportations of traffic offenders skyrocketed under Trump administration (Austin American-Statesman).

 

THE CLOSER

What's in a name? Charlotte Elizabeth Diana, George Alexander Louis and ... the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge ended suspense and named the newest royal Louis Arthur Charles.

And finally … More than half a century later, a fascinating and final batch of 19,045 documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy became available to researchers and the public yesterday at the National Archives and Records Administration. President Trump's directive to release materials followed a re-review with some redactions for privacy, plus a subset of withheld documents at the request of the FBI and CIA.