The Hill's Morning Report — McConnell tells Pence shutdown must end

The Hill's Morning Report — McConnell tells Pence shutdown must end
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***BREAKING NEWS … President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE’s former adviser Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneSchiff says investigators seeking to identify who Giuliani spoke to on unlisted '-1' number What if impeachment fails? Juan Williams: Trump has nothing left but smears MORE has been indicted by special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE on charges of witness tampering and lying to Congress. Read the indictment HERE.***

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***

Republicans are wavering as the partial government shutdown reaches 35 days and polls show President Trump absorbing the bulk of the blame. 

On Thursday, six GOP senators peeled off to vote in favor of a bill to reopen the government with no additional wall funding, compared to only one Democrat who voted in favor of Trump’s proposed immigration deal. Both “messaging votes” failed in the Senate, as expected (The Hill). 

But the real drama happened behind closed doors, where GOP senators – from Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic challenger to Joni Ernst releases ad depicting her as firing gun at him Senate confirms eight Trump court picks in three days The case for censuring, and not impeaching, Donald Trump MORE (R-Ky.) on down – vented their frustration to Vice President Pence and demanded that Trump bring the shutdown to an end as soon as possible.

From The Hill’s Alexander Bolton:

One of the most remarkable moments during the Senate luncheon came when McConnell told Pence that shuttering the government to try to secure funding for a border wall was not a smart approach.

“McConnell talked about how we need to bring this process to a close; we should never have had a shutdown; they don’t work; I’ve said this numerous times; I don’t know how many times I’ve told you there’s no education in the second kick of a mule,” said a GOP source familiar with the meeting.

The Washington Post: GOP senators clash over shutdown blame.

Here’s where things stand:

 

The White House

Pressure is growing on Trump after his proposal went down in the Senate and GOP senators vented their frustration to the vice president.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP senator blocks Armenian genocide resolution Hannity slams Stern for Clinton interview: 'Not the guy I grew up listening to' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem dilemma on articles of impeachment MORE (R-S.C.) says he spoke to the president on Thursday and urged him to consider temporarily reopening the government while negotiations over wall money continue.

Trump said he would consider a three-week continuing resolution – if it includes “some sort of pro-rated down payment on the wall.” White House press secretary Sarah HuckabeeSarah Elizabeth SandersBill Press: Mulvaney proves need for daily briefings White House correspondent April Ryan to moderate fundraising event for Buttigieg White House press secretary defends lack of daily briefings: Trump 'is the most accessible president in history' MORE Sanders said the down payment would have to be “large.”

Senate Democrats and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Pelosi 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments Bloomberg: Trump should be impeached On The Money: Congress races to beat deadline on shutdown | Trump asks Supreme Court to shield financial records from House Democrats | House passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading MORE (D-Calif.) shot that down immediately.

“This is not a reasonable agreement.” – Pelosi

Trump also said he has “other alternatives” he’s considering. One of these options is to declare a national emergency.

 

The Senate

McConnell and Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law | Michigan governor seeks to pause Medicaid work requirements | New front in fight over Medicaid block grants House, Senate Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law Why a second Trump term and a Democratic Congress could be a nightmare scenario for the GOP MORE (D-N.Y.) huddled immediately after the dueling bills went down in the Senate, a sign of the sudden urgency to find a compromise.

A bipartisan group of moderates is pitching a three-week stopgap bill, hoping that Trump will agree to temporarily reopen the government while negotiations continue (The Hill).

There was also some talk about “broadening negotiations” in hopes of finding new incentives that could lead to a way out.

“I actually think the president will have moved this process forward … by beginning the process of expanding it so that we can reach a conclusion.” – Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntTrump's legal team huddles with Senate Republicans Overnight Defense: Trump cancels presser, cuts short NATO trip | Viral video catches leaders appearing to gossip about Trump | Dem witnesses say Trump committed impeachable offenses | Trump reportedly mulling more troops in Middle East Trump legal team gears up for Senate impeachment trial in meeting with GOP senators MORE (R-Mo.) 

Either way, Senate Republicans are growing restless and are eager to bring an end to the impasse, with wall money or not.

“You can’t [resolve the border dispute] when the government is shut down.” – Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenate confirms eight Trump court picks in three days The Hill's Morning Report - Dem impeachment report highlights phone records Republicans raise concerns over Trump pardoning service members MORE (R-Alaska)

“Compromise is not a dirty word. It is not a sign of weakness. It is a sign of strength.” — Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGiffords, Demand Justice to pressure GOP senators to reject Trump judicial pick Senate confirms eight Trump court picks in three days Lawmakers call for investigation into program meant to help student loan borrowers with disabilities MORE (R-Maine)

 

The House

Pelosi is riding it out.

There was talk from some top Democrats about a counteroffer to Trump that would include billions of dollars for “smart wall” technology but nothing for a physical barrier.

Pelosi disputed reports that House Democrats are preparing to offer anything additional to Trump (The Hill).

“That’s not true. That’s not true. That’s not true.” – Pelosi

The Hill: Dems strengthen hand in shutdown fight.
The Hill: Trump, GOP losing shutdown fight in court of public opinion.

Federal workers impacted by the shutdown will miss their second consecutive paychecks on Friday. Tax filing season begins on Monday and could get messy (CNBC).



LEADING THE DAY

CONGRESS: The Senate Intelligence Committee subpoenaed former Trump lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenKaren McDougal sues Fox News over alleged slander Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Five things to watch for at Trump's NATO meetings MORE to testify in February and he will comply, Cohen’s lawyer said.

Cohen pleaded guilty last year to lying to Congress in 2017 and will be asked by senators to correct the record about matters related to his previous testimony (CNN). He is due to report to federal prison in March.

The Senate committee’s hearings about Russia and matters that intersect with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation have to date been conducted behind closed doors, a likely scenario with Cohen.

The man who once called himself Trump’s “fixer” postponed his public testimony scheduled Feb. 7 before the House Oversight and Reform Committee, citing “threats” he said Trump and attorney Rudy Giuliani made about him and his family.

The chairmen of the House Oversight and Intelligence committees have said they will continue to pursue testimony from Cohen, but dates and details, and whether subpoenas will be issued, remained unclear on Thursday.

Meanwhile, progressive groups want Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealOvernight Health Care: House to vote next week on drug prices bill | Conway says Trump trying to find 'balance' on youth vaping | US spent trillion on hospitals in 2018 Democrats could introduce articles of impeachment next week House to vote next week on sweeping bill to lower drug prices MORE (D-Mass.), the chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, to request from the Treasury Department copies of the president’s tax returns, which Trump maintains are under IRS audit and will not be made public (The Hill).

Neal is defending his approach at the outset of the new Congress (Bloomberg).

“This has to be part of a carefully prepared and documented legal case,” the chairman told reporters Thursday.

Many Democrats in 2016 objected in principle to candidate Trump’s decision not to disclose his business and personal tax filings. Others continue to assert that as president, Trump seeks to obscure financial details he believes might be politically or legally injurious. Analysts recently told Hill.TV that most Americans want to see the president’s tax filings.

Profiles: Meet Reps. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarAl Green calls for including Trump's 'racism' in impeachment articles Republicans disavow GOP candidate who said 'we should hang' Omar Hillicon Valley: Trump officials propose retaliatory tariffs over French digital tax | FBI classifies FaceApp as threat | Twitter revamps policies to comply with privacy laws | Zuckerberg defends political ads policy MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHouse moves ahead on long-stalled resolution supporting two states for Israelis and Palestinians GOP leader says he had 'a hard time' believing Pelosi Al Green calls for including Trump's 'racism' in impeachment articles MORE (D-Mich.), the first Muslim women to serve in Congress. They’re attracting unusual scrutiny from Republicans and conservative media outlets during their early weeks in Washington (The Hill). … And The New York Times profiles Pelosi as “tough as nails.”



IN FOCUS/SHARP TAKES

POLITICS: The 2020 Democratic presidential contenders are fanning out across the country to lay out their platforms, defend past positions and shape their biographical stories.

> The Washington Post reports that Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump to hold campaign rally in Michigan Castro hits fundraising threshold for December debate Buttigieg: Harris 'deserves to be under anybody's consideration' for vice president MORE (D-Mass.) will propose a “wealth tax” on Americans with $50 million or more in assets.

> Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump to hold campaign rally in Michigan Castro hits fundraising threshold for December debate Buttigieg draws fresh scrutiny, attacks in sprint to Iowa MORE, who has taken heat from the left for giving a paid speech last year in support of a GOP incumbent who was in a tight House race with a Democrat, says he’s unmoved by the criticism (The Daily Beast).

“I read in The New York Times today that one of my problems is, if I ever run for president, I like Republicans. Well, bless me, father, for I have sinned.” — Biden

> Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisCastro hits fundraising threshold for December debate Poll: Majority of voters name TV as primary news source Buttigieg: Harris 'deserves to be under anybody's consideration' for vice president MORE’s (D-Calif.) past has come into focus for her relationship with then-San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown when she was an up-and-coming prosecutor (Politico).

> Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSenators want FERC to protect critical infrastructure from Huawei threats Krystal Ball: What Harris's exit means for the other 2020 candidates Democrats hit gas on impeachment MORE (D-Colo), who was under consideration to be Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump to hold campaign rally in Michigan Saagar Enjeti ponders Hillary Clinton's 2020 plans Political ad spending set to explode in 2020 MORE’s vice presidential nominee, ginned up his own presidential buzz on Thursday with a fiery floor speech denouncing the shutdown (The Washington Post).

> Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardCastro hits fundraising threshold for December debate Saagar Enjeti ponders Hillary Clinton's 2020 plans The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi says House will move forward with impeachment MORE (D-Hawaii) released a new presidential campaign ad highlighting her military service and warning against “interventionist regime change wars.

Gabbard has a lot of enemies on the left. The Daily Kos announced Wednesday they’ll back her primary challenger in the House, citing Gabbard’s “problematic history on abortion rights, her support for Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, and her refusal to join her Democratic colleagues in the House in backing progressive priorities like an assault weapons ban.”

More from the campaign trail … The Koch network, which holds a retreat for donors this weekend, decided to stay out of the 2020 presidential race and will not back Trump for reelection (The Washington Post) ...Young voters keep moving to the left on social issues, including Republicans (The New York Times).

And spotted at last night’s Washington Wizards game…

 

 

 

 

 

Pelosi watched her hometown Golden State Warriors beat the Wizards 126 to 118 last night at Capital One Arena. Shortly before the game, the Warriors hung out with former President Obama. Obama and Warriors star Stephen Curry are golf buddies.

 

 

The Morning Report is created by journalists Jonathan Easley & Alexis Simendinger. We want to hear from you! @jeasley@thehill.com and @asimendinger@thehill.com. We invite you to share The Hill’s reporting and newsletters, and encourage others to SUBSCRIBE!

OPINION

White House immigration agenda hurts Senate Republicans in 2020, by Jordan Bruneau, opinion contributor, The Hill. http://bit.ly/2FWXzed

Venezuela’s curse is nearing his end, by Carolyn Kissane of New York University, opinion contributor, The Hill. https://bit.ly/2MuY4NV



WHERE AND WHEN

The House meets for pro forma purposes at 2 p.m.

The Senate meets at noon for pro forma business.

The president has lunch with Pompeo at 12:30 p.m. At 1:45 p.m., Trump hosts a discussion with U.S. mayors about the economy, and at 2:45 p.m. he holds a roundtable with Hispanic pastors.

ELSEWHERE

> Venezuela: The United States is shifting its financial support for the Venezuelan people to the interim government of Juan Guaidó (Reuters). However, during a press conference on Thursday top military brass in Caracas vowed to back President Nicolás Maduro amid continued national unrest (The Associated Press). Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoReport: Pompeo had secret meeting with GOP donors in London The shifting impeachment positions of Jonathan Turley The Hill's Morning Report - Dem dilemma on articles of impeachment MORE urged allies in Latin America and in Europe to support Guaidó (Reuters).

“The Venezuelan people rose up to take back their country.” — Pompeo, interviewed on Fox News

“What we’re focusing on today is disconnecting the illegitimate Maduro regime from the source of its revenues.” — White House national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonThe shifting impeachment positions of Jonathan Turley The key impeachment hearings are before an appeals court, not the House Judiciary panel Beyond the myth of Sunni-Shia wars in the Middle East MORE 

 

 

On Thursday, the State Department ordered non-emergency U.S. government employees to leave Venezuela and advised all other Americans in the country to consider departing for safety reasons.

> Khashoggi murder: A United Nations expert will lead an international inquiry into the October killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi (Reuters). Meanwhile, at the annual World Economic Forum in Switzerland this week, participants from Saudi Arabia attempted to move beyond the Khashoggi slaying, which was committed inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, during events in the Alps with international peers (Reuters). 

> Media: BuzzFeed, HuffPost and Gannett wrestled this week with announcements of employee layoffs, citing ongoing struggles to find revenue models that can sustain the digital news and newspaper companies. This week alone, the media industry nationwide lost about 1,000 jobs (CNN). “Profits have proved elusive in an advertising market dominated by two giants — Google and Facebook,” wrote The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi about challenges faced inside digital news outlets.

 

 

> Manafort: Former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortGiuliani meets with fired Ukrainian prosecutor who pushed Biden, 2016 claims: report Top State Department official tells senators he has not seen evidence of Ukrainian interference Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe MORE is due back in court today as prosecutors and defense lawyers argue over whether he lied to investigators (The Associated Press).

> Alzheimer’s: Researchers have found a strong link between toxic enzymes produced by bacteria in gum disease and patients with Alzheimer’s, raising hopes for diagnostic tests and possible treatment (Science News).

> Sleep: Lack of sleep is hazardous to human health and may shorten life, scientists warn (The Washington Post). … Rocking motion puts adults to sleep faster, makes slumber deeper and improves memory, scientists report. Beyond swaying in a hammock, rocking beds are a thing (Science News).

 



THE CLOSER

And finally … Kudos to Morning Report quiz winners!

We were inspired by the anniversary of the first sales of Macintosh computers in 1984 and want to congratulate the quiz masters this week who correctly answered five questions tied to news about Apple: Milt Mungo, William Chattam, David Straney, Barbara Gary, Rosemary Morretta, Carolyn Dixon and Sandy Sycafoose.

They knew that Wall Street analysts trimmed projections this month for the price of Apple stock because iPhone sales are projected to decline in 2019 (The New York Times and Investors.com).

In 1984 when Steve Jobs unveiled the Macintosh in California, the price tag was $2,500 (watch his presentation HERE).

Apple stirred some controversy last year when it introduced the latest Apple Watch and boasted it can detect cardiac performance akin to a medical electrocardiogram (The New York Times).

Apple’s now-famous and award-winning “1984” commercial for the Macintosh computer, which aired once during the 1984 Super Bowl, was the work of film director Ridley Scott, who was already hailed at that time for 1979’s “Alien” and 1982’s “Blade Runner.” (During an interview HERE, Scott said he envisioned the Macintosh commercial as a mini-film drawn from ad agency Chiat/Day’s story boards and script.) 

Apple CEO Tim Cook last week advocated for greater consumer privacy online with a proposal for a clearinghouse of data brokers, to be regulated by the Federal Trade Commission, which he argued could allow consumers to delete their data (TIME and WIRED).