The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump: GOP has `clear contrast' with Dems on immigration

The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump: GOP has `clear contrast' with Dems on immigration
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Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. TGIF! Our newsletter gets you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Co-creators are Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver (CLICK HERE to subscribe!). On Twitter, find us at @asimendinger and @alweaver22.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness school deans call for lifting country-specific visa caps Bolton told ex-Trump aide to call White House lawyers about Ukraine pressure campaign: report Federal prosecutors in New York examining Giuliani business dealings with Ukraine: report MORE appealed to his base on Thursday during a speech about legal immigration, inviting tepid reactions from fellow conservatives and a withering “dead on arrival” rejoinder from Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi says Trump sanctions package on Turkey 'falls very short' Graham throws support behind Trump's Turkey sanctions Feehery: Trump may be down, but he's not out yet MORE (D-Calif.).

“We are presenting a clear contrast,” the president said, speaking to guests seated in the Rose Garden. “Democrats are proposing open borders, lower wages and, frankly, lawless chaos. We are proposing an immigration plan that puts the jobs, wages and safety of American workers first.” 

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Trump’s outline would replace family-sponsored migration with “merit-based” visa allotments under immigration laws, an idea instantly panned by conservative commentator Ann CoulterAnn Hart CoulterConservatives rail against Braves for reducing 'tomahawk chop' after Native American pitcher calls it 'disrespectful' Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers ramp up Silicon Valley antitrust probe | Treasury sanctions North Korean cyber groups | Thiel to host Kobach fundraiser Ann Coulter singles out Klobuchar during Democratic debate: She is 'killing it' MORE as meaningless to reduce illegal immigration. She called the president’s ideas “a gift to the Koch brothers,” the billionaire conservatives who are critical of Trump, especially on immigration.

The president did not try to mask his intention to lay down political markers for the 2020 election rather than legislative proposals that could surmount partisan impasses that are decades in the making.

“If for some reason, possibly political, we can’t get the Democrats to approve this merit-based, high-security plan, then we will get it approved immediately after the election when we take back the House, keep the Senate and, of course, hold the presidency,” Trump said (The Hill).

The Washington Post: White House says the president did not include protections for young “dreamers” because remedying their undocumented status is too “divisive.”

As Niall Stanage writes, the politics of immigration that Trump helped engineer are harsh and unforgiving for anyone searching for a bipartisan legislative approach after the 2020 election. The president’s latest proposal is finding few friends.

GOP lawmakers acknowledged the White House plan, spearheaded by senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerButtigieg knocks Trump as a 'walking conflict of interest' Biden's weak response to Trump is a lesson for Democratic candidates Mark Hamill zings Ivanka Trump for 'Star Wars' tweet MORE, is not intended to become law. Other ideas, including an asylum reform proposal introduced this week by Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham throws support behind Trump's Turkey sanctions Hillicon Valley: Warren takes on Facebook over political ads | Zuckerberg defends meetings with conservatives | Civil liberties groups sound alarm over online extremism bill Fury over Trump Syria decision grows MORE (R-S.C.), are unlikely to gain traction this year (The Hill).

McClatchy: Trump immigration plan revamps asylum, requires work skills and learning English.

Reuters: Trump proposed maintaining the overall numbers of legal immigrants each year steady while shifting to a “merit-based” system of selection, which he said would result in 57 percent of green cards being granted based on employment and skills.

 

 

 

LEADING THE DAY

POLITICS & CAMPAIGNS: New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de Blasio2020 Presidential Candidates Cooperate, or else: New York threatens fines to force people to help block immigration enforcement DNC raises qualifying thresholds for fifth presidential debate MORE’s 2020 presidential bid is officially underway, and the early reviews are not great.

After his 2020 campaign’s reveal was scooped by a high school journalist in Missouri, de Blasio kicked off his campaign with an appearance on “Good Morning America” Thursday morning and was immediately met by protesters outside the studio. The reception was not a surprise as most New Yorkers wished he would have remained on the sidelines. According to a Quinnipiac University Poll released last month, 76 percent of New Yorkers said that he should not launch a 2020 bid  (Politico). 

Later on, he was on the receiving end of multiple shots from Trump, who went so far as to record a video from Air Force One calling de Blasio “the worst mayor in the history of New York City” while en route to New York for fundraising and predict that he “would be very surprised to see him in there for a long period.”

 

 

As Jonathan Easley reports, de Blasio’s entrance also brings the field to two dozen candidates, a historically large field that presents unique challenges for the candidates, the national party and the media.

Despite the tough start, de Blasio faces an uphill climb not only to make a dent in the 2020 Democratic primary, but even to make the debate stage. A late entry, and perhaps the last one in the race, de Blasio is by no means guaranteed a spot on-stage at either of the June 26 or 27 debates and has less than a month to reach polling and fundraising thresholds to reach the debate stage, an issue that could also plague the likes of Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockWarren expresses support for Indigenous Peoples' Day 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the October showdown The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster MORE and Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand Bennet2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the October showdown The Hill's Campaign Report: Impeachment fight to take center stage at Dem debate 2020 Presidential Candidates MORE (D-Colo.) given their late 2020 bids.

More than likely, de Blasio’s entrance makes just one more candidate in a massive field of contenders vying for money, media attention, endorsements and support from primary voters. The Democratic field includes a former vice president, seven sitting senators, four members of the House, three former members of Congress, two current governors, a former governor, three mayors, a former mayor, and two business people. Six women and six people of color are in the running. There are contenders from Alaska and Hawaii. But the candidates will have to get creative in looking for ways to stand out in the pack, with the Democratic National Committee facing some difficult decisions with the debates and generally acting as a referee in the looming free-for-all. 

Democrats interviewed by The Hill described a volatile, high stakes and unprecedented undertaking and said they had no idea how it would shake out. 

Fox News: Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSupport drops for Medicare for All but increases for public option Bolton told ex-Trump aide to call White House lawyers about Ukraine pressure campaign: report Federal prosecutors in New York examining Giuliani business dealings with Ukraine: report MORE up by double digits in Democratic race. 

> Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s (R) decision to sign into law legislation that essentially outlaws abortion has raised the topic into a top-tier issue on the 2020 map and brought the issue to the forefront of the public’s consciousness after conservatives launched a coordinated messaging effort (The New York Times). 

The move has also put moderate Senate Republicans on the defensive after their votes over the past two years to confirm a horde of conservative judges who could be in a position to decide whether restrictive abortion laws will stand up in court. 

When pressed by CNN on Thursday, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret Collins10 top Republicans who continue to deny the undeniable GOP braces for impeachment brawl Furious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria MORE (R-Maine), a pro-choice Republican who is up for reelection next year, labeled the new law in Alabama a “terrible law” and “very extreme.” When pressed over whether she thought Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughThe impeachment controversy drags Supreme Court into the politics of the Trump era Supreme Court can prove its independence — or its partisan capture Overnight Health Care — Presented by Coalition Against Surprise Medical Billing — Planned Parenthood plans M campaign for 2020 | Dem candidates embrace aggressive step on drug prices | Officials propose changes to encourage 'value-based' care MORE would strike down the law, she hinted that she believes he would.

"The Alabama law is a terrible law – it’s very extreme – it essentially bans all abortions.” Collins said. “I can’t imagine that any justice could find that to be consistent with the previous precedence."

With the issue taking hold in Congress, it has been a hot topic on the 2020 scene as Democrats continue to denounce the law. Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Gillibrand2020 Presidential Candidates Krystal Ball: Yang campaign a 'triumph of substance over the theatre' Three 2020 candidates have missed about half of Senate votes MORE (D-N.Y.) said the laws emanating from various states go “against Christian faith” (CBS News). South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegO'Rourke hits back at Buttigieg over criticism of his gun buyback proposal Chasten Buttigieg fundraising for husband Pete overseas Progressives fume at Buttigieg, warn him not to attack Warren at debate MORE also panned the law during a speech to the City Club of Chicago.

"I don't think that you are free in this country if your reproductive health can be criminalized,” Buttigieg said, adding later that legislation to codify the constitutional right to have an abortion is “something that deserves to be taken seriously.” 

The New York Times: In Alabama, opposition to abortion runs deep regardless of gender.

The Associated Press: Missouri’s Republican-led House today is expected to pass a sweeping bill to ban abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy, propeling the measure closer to state law.

IN FOCUS/SHARP TAKES

WHITE HOUSE & ADMINISTRATION: Administration officials agreed on Thursday to brief the Senate next week about Iran and intelligence that prompted the president and his advisers to warn that attacks on U.S. interests by Tehran were a real and present danger (The Hill).

In Middle East and European capitals, officials share confusion expressed by members of Congress about how seriously to take Trump’s warnings to Tehran and references to classified intelligence information. European leaders want restraint (The Atlantic). 

Members of Congress from both parties point to White House national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonBolton told ex-Trump aide to call White House lawyers about Ukraine pressure campaign: report Ex-top Trump Russia aide to testify about 'shadow policy' on Ukraine: report Bolton to write memoir on time serving under Trump: report MORE as the driver of Trump’s Iran policy. Some lawmakers are seeking additional information in order to weigh whether intelligence supports deployment of U.S. military assets to the Middle East.

Trump has talked tough publicly about his willingness to send “more” than 120,000 troops to defend U.S. interests if Iran poses a national security threat.

But the president also told acting Defense Secretary Patrick ShanahanPatrick Michael ShanahanDefense chief calls on European allies to be wary of China's investments, blasts Russia Pentagon chief approves 20 more miles of border wall Why Dave Norquist is the perfect choice for DOD's deputy secretary MORE that he does not want war with Iran. In a tweet on Wednesday, Trump said he was confident Iran “will want to talk soon,” signaling an openness to diplomacy that officials said is not shared by Bolton or staunch Iran critic Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoTrump: Let Assad, Russia or China protect the Kurds Reporter presses Pompeo on whether he met with Giuliani in Warsaw Pompeo: 'I wish the NBA would acknowledge' China's treatment of Uyghur Muslims MORE (The New York Times).

Reuters: Inside the weakening governing power of Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani.

Reuters: Pelosi said on Thursday that Trump does not have congressional authorization to go to war with Iran.

 

 

> Trump business: Revenue at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort dropped 10 percent last year, and the most recent federal financial disclosures by the president on Thursday offers a mixed overall picture of the president’s finances (The Washington Post). The documents also show Trump took out a 30-year mortgage on an oceanfront house steps from Mar-a-Lago, which currently sits empty on the rental market (Reuters). The president’s mortgage loan was for the purchase of a house owned by his sister, Maryanne Trump Barry, a former federal judge, and sold to a company headed by the president’s two oldest sons (Palm Beach Daily News).

> Trump’s tax returns: The Treasury Department and IRS are set to miss a deadline today to comply with subpoenas for Trump's tax returns, as the dispute over the documents appears headed for a legal battle (The Hill). 

> Russia-related sanctions: The Treasury Department, in a move likely to escalate tensions between the United States and Russia, on Thursday announced sanctions on Russian and Chechen officials linked to the deaths of two whistleblowers critical of Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinFunding for Radio Free Europe to return to Hungary will send a strong message Juan Williams: Trump, the conspiracy theory president Putin: Trump not to blame for lack of improved relations with Russia MORE’s government. Five people and one entity were sanctioned by the administration for “gross violations of human rights in Russia, pursuant to the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act of 2012” (The Wall Street Journal).

> Trump’s advisers: The president’s Twitter guru and former caddie, Dan Scavino, is the ultimate insider (Politico).

> The wall: The president’s exacting instructions about new and renovated sections of barriers along the U.S. southern border, which he said on Thursday will span at least 400 miles by the end of 2020, vex the engineers (The Washington Post).

The Morning Report is created by journalists Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver. We want to hear from you! Email: asimendinger@thehill.com and aweaver@thehill.com. We invite you to share The Hill’s reporting and newsletters, and encourage others to SUBSCRIBE!

 

OPINION

Vladimir Putin is messing with our democracy and he wants us to know it, by Daniel N. Hoffman, former Central Intelligence Agency chief of station, opinion contributor, The Hill. https://bit.ly/2Eb0o9O

The intensifying trade war could quadruple economic damage, by Eric Lascelles, chief economist for RBC Global Asset Management Inc., opinion contributor, The Hill. https://bit.ly/2JKUsry

WHERE AND WHEN

Hill.TV’s “Rising” program, starting at 8 a.m., features Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottCBO: Pelosi bill to lower drug prices saves Medicare 5 billion Democrats divided on surprise medical bill fix NYC teacher suing DeVos over student loan forgiveness program MORE (D-Va.), reflecting on the 65th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision; Reps. Rob WoodallWilliam (Rob) Robert WoodallHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad The House Republicans and Democrats not seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (R-Ga.) and Harley RoudaHarley Edwin RoudaEx-Trump aide on Russia testifies for 10 hours as part of impeachment inquiry Democratic lawmaker says Barr's reported meeting with Murdoch should be investigated Federal funding for Chinese buses risks our national security MORE (D-Calif.), discussing infrastructure; and U.S Border Patrol Chief Brian Hastings on the latest news at the southern border. http://thehill.com/hilltv

The House convenes at 9 a.m. and will vote on the Equality Act.

The Senate will meet at 3 p.m. on Monday to resume consideration of the nomination of David P. Collins to be a United States circuit judge for the 9th Circuit.

The president returns from New York City and speaks in Washington at a conference of the National Association of Realtors at 2 p.m.

Vice President Pence on Saturday will deliver the commencement address at Taylor University in Upland, Ind.

First lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpMelania Trump breaks ground on new White House tennis pavilion Overnight Health Care — Presented by Coalition Against Surprise Medical Billing — Buttigieg unveils aggressive plan to lower drug prices | Supreme Court abortion case poses major test for Trump picks | Trump takes heat from right over vaping crackdown Kroger to stop sales of e-cigarettes at stores MORE and Karen PenceKaren Sue PenceThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — House Dems subpoena Giuliani associates Trump feud with Minneapolis mayor to take center stage at rally Karen Pence launches an Instagram account MORE are honorary co-chairs for Blue Star Museums, which kicks off on Saturday and ends on Labor Day, Sept. 2. The National Endowment for the Arts and Blue Star Families partner to provide free admission to active-duty military personnel and their families when they visit more than 2,000 participating museums nationwide. Information is HERE.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center will host a Saturday event to bring Asian Pacific American culture to Washington DC — through Los Angeles. The party at the City Market Social House in L.A. will honor some of the country’s Asian Pacific American creators, including fusion cuisine chef Helene An and the An family; Asian American R&B jazz band Hiroshima; Jay Park, a choreographer, songwriter, entrepreneur and hip hop and R&B artist; and Vivek Ranadivé,, founder of the TIBCO tech company and the first Indian American majority owner of the NBA’s Sacramento Kings. Democrats joining the honorees from Congress’s California delegation: Reps. Jimmy GomezJimmy GomezHouse Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Lawmakers call for 'time out' on facial recognition tech MORE, Ted LieuTed W. LieuLieu accuses Trump of asking Ukraine to 'manufacture dirt' on Biden Lieu weighs in on impeachment inquiry Lieu calls for change to House rules, saying administration 'brought a machete to a knife fight' MORE, Judy ChuJudy May ChuDemocrats see whistleblower report as smoking gun Lawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator US must stay true to its values and fight the public charge rule MORE, Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoOvernight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Impeachment inquiry overshadows Trump at UN | Veterans push VA to follow through on reforms | Iranian leader open to changes in nuke deal Veterans groups push VA to follow through on reforms Democrat Raul Ruiz challenged by Republican with the same name in California race MORE, Doris MatsuiDoris Okada MatsuiBlood cancer patients deserve equal access to the cure Hillicon Valley: Tech grapples with California 'gig economy' law | FCC to investigate Sprint over millions in subsidies | House bill aims to protect telecom networks | Google wins EU fight over 'right to be forgotten' | 27 nations sign cyber rules pact House bill aims to secure telecom networks against foreign interference MORE and Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Video depicting Trump killing media, critics draws backlash Backlash erupts at video depicting Trump killing media, critics Cindy McCain condemns video of fake Trump shooting political opponents, late husband MORE. Ambrosio Brian F. Enciso III, the deputy consul general of the Philippines, and Akira Chiba, Japan’s consul general based in Los Angeles, will also attend. Information is HERE.

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ELSEWHERE

Brexit: Talks between Tories and Labour collapsed today in the United Kingdom, yet another setback in the years of discussions about how to withdraw from the European Union (The Guardian).

State Watch: The Trump administration said on Thursday it was formally canceling $929 million in previously awarded funding for California’s high-speed rail program after rejecting an appeal by the state (Reuters).

Health: Want to know what helps prevent dementia? Exercise (The Associated Press).

Architecture: I.M. Pei, the Chinese-born, Harvard-educated and world-famous architect, died Thursday at the age of 102. Pei was probably best known for designing the East Building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington and the glass pyramid that serves as an entry for the Louvre in Paris. But early in his career he designed commercial real estate projects and took on modest commissions, such as a modernist addition to New College in Sarasota, Fla. (The New York Times). 

Marlon Bundo, the Pence family’s beloved bunny may be adored by the second family but he does not do much in the way of book sales. As Politico’s Gabby Orr reports, a trio of children’s books centered around “BOTUS” have not been a commercial success, having netted between $2,501 and $5,000 in income for the family last year, according to financial disclosures released Thursday.

Pence has joked in the past that he and the president are very much alike, save for “a whole lot of zeroes.”

THE CLOSER

And finally … Bravo to winners of this week’s Morning Report Quiz, about TV and movie celebrities who died recently and left their marks on entertainment. 

These puzzle masters aced the questions: Ki L. Harvey, Lorraine Lindberg, Leanna DeKing, Tim Aiken, Andrew Kokas, Linda Tillery, Peter Delloro, Rich Davis, Ray Fleming, Ron Wolfarth, Allyson Foster, Donna Nackero, Carol Katz, Susan Reyes, Cheryl A. Gibson, Karen Fisher Gutheil, Elizabeth Murphy, Greg Stetson, Norm Roberts, Ramona Palmatier, Stewart Baker, Randall S. Patrick, Frank Hatfield, Dan Hebert, Michael Womble, Laura Silver, Rich Gruber, Renee Rodriguez, David Straney, Glen Clark, William Mattingly, Aaron Gebard, Serena Reeves, Jerry Kovar, Kym Dicome, Kathy Bilskie, Peter J. Stewart, Brian Repsher, Owen Johnson and Luther Berg.

Actress Peggy Lipton, who died Saturday at age 72, played Julie Barnes in hit series “The Mod Squad.” 

Zoologist and “Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom” host Jim Fowler, who died on May 8, gained a huge and appreciative following as a late-night guest who brought wild and zoo animals to ad-lib with Johnny Carson.

Funny man Tim Conway, who died Tuesday, created television gold from 1967 to 1978 with Carol Burnett.

Doris Day, who died Tuesday at age 97, starred with some of her era’s most celebrated leading men. Humphrey Bogart, however, was never one of her cinematic love interests.