Most diverse Congress in history poised to take power

Most diverse Congress in history poised to take power
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A wave of new lawmakers is arriving on Capitol Hill, with the most diverse Congress ever set to take power.

Republicans swell the ranks following their midterm gains, but there is more to members than just party affiliation. In that spirit, The Hill took a look at the composition, attributes and quirks of the voting members in the new 114th Congress.

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There is a record number of female lawmakers at 104, alongside 430 men, following the departure of former Rep. Michael Grimm (R-N.Y.).

Rep.-elect Mia Love (Utah) is making history as the first black Republican woman in Congress. Love, fellow Rep.-elect Will Hurd (Texas) and Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottGOP senators dismiss Booker reparations proposal On The Money — Presented by Job Creators Network — GOP senators urge Trump not to nominate Cain | Treasury expected to miss Dem deadline on Trump tax returns | Party divisions force Dems to scrap budget vote | House passes IRS reform bill GOP senators urge Trump not to pick Cain for Fed MORE (S.C.) also are part of the largest black Republican class in Congress since the Reconstruction era. There will be 46 black lawmakers in the new Congress.

Hispanic lawmakers will number 33, with 30 in the House and three senators. Twelve Asian-Americans will also serve, with 11 in the House and Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoHillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech Dems introduce bill to tackle 'digital divide' Overnight Energy: Collins receives more donations from Texas oil, gas industry than from Maine residents | Interior chief left meetings off schedule | Omar controversy jeopardizes Ocasio-Cortez trip to coal mine MORE (D-Hawaii) in the upper chamber. There are two lawmakers of Native American ancestry, both from Oklahoma, Reps. Tom Cole (R) and Markwayne Mullin (R).

Lawmakers have an average age of 57. The Senate is older than the House, with an average age of 61 to the lower chamber's 57. Democrats on average are older than Republicans in both chambers, at 62 to 60 in the Senate and 59 to 54 in the House. 

Senate Republicans gain some young blood in this Congress with additions such as Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonOvernight Defense: Senators show skepticism over Space Force | Navy drops charges against officers in deadly collision | Trump taps next Navy chief Senators show deep skepticism on Space Force proposal GOP senators introduce bill to reduce legal immigration  MORE (Ark.), who is 37, and Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerCain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Obama-era diplomat launches Colorado Senate bid, would be first openly gay male senator MORE (Colo.), who is 40. The departure of Rep. Ralph HallRalph Moody HallFormer Texas GOP Rep. Ralph Hall dead at 95 GOP fights off primary challengers in deep-red Texas Most diverse Congress in history poised to take power MORE (R-Texas) leaves Reps. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) and Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.), both 85, as the oldest members in the House.  

Compared to numbers in the last Congress from the Congressional Research Service, the House stays steady at 57, but the Senate is getting younger, down to 61 years old on average, from 62. 

A vast majority of lawmakers identify as Christian, either Protestant or Catholic, along with 16 Mormons. But a number of different religions are also represented in the new Congress: There are 28 Jewish-Americans, two Buddhists, two Muslims and one Hindu.

Lawmakers also come from a variety of work backgrounds, but one profession still dominates the group: 184 are lawyers.

There are a total of 13 lawmakers from agricultural backgrounds, including Rep. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), who grows grapes at a vineyard back home and founded the Congressional Wine Caucus.

Twenty-seven have a healthcare background. There are also three former aviators, including Rep.-elect Martha McSally (R-Ariz.), who was the first female pilot to fly in combat.

Many come from other positions in public service: 10 have been governors, 32 were mayors, and 251 served in state legislatures. 

Congress lost its last World War II veterans with the departures of Reps. John Dingell (D-Mich.) and Hall. But there are newly arriving veterans, including Rep.-elect Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), who won two medals for service in Iraq, and Sen.-elect Joni Ernst (R-Iowa).

Megan Caldwell, Leeann Doerflein, Crystal Hill, Niki Papadogiannakis, and Eliza Schmitt contributed.