Congressional leaders expect funding deal to be unveiled Monday

Congressional leaders expect funding deal to be unveiled Monday
© Greg Nash

Congressional leaders expect the legislative text of a year-end omnibus spending bill to be released Monday, and they say it will likely be linked to a major deal on taxes.

“I understand the current projection is for the House to post the omnibus Monday and vote on it by Wednesday,” Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynTrump goes scorched earth against impeachment talk The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Bipartisan House bill calls for strategy to protect 5G networks from foreign threats MORE (Texas) told reporters. “The goal is to wrap things up by Wednesday evening.”

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He said the omnibus would be linked to a package extending expiring tax provisions. Senate negotiators say that package is likely to make several important tax breaks open-ended and place a moratorium on two ObamaCare taxes.

“They seem to be linked, although I can’t tell you whether it will be one vote or two votes, but clearly they’re part of the overall negotiations,” he added.

But Cornyn cautioned “there are a few outstanding issues that have not been resolved.”

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump gambles in push for drug import proposal Biden's role in Anita Hill hearings defended by witness not allowed to testify 'Congress' worst tax idea ever'? Hardly. MORE (R-Utah), who is involved in the talks, said, “sooner or later we come against the wall of having to act, and I think when that happens hopefully when that happens we can get this done. ... I think it's a matter of days." 

Cornyn’s statement mirrored a prediction made the day before by House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers’s (R-Ky.), who said the text of the omnibus would be unveiled Monday to set up a vote Wednesday and meet Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmash storm hits Capitol Hill Debate with Donald Trump? Just say no Ex-Trump adviser says GOP needs a better health-care message for 2020 MORE’s (R-Wis.) pledge to observe the three-day waiting period for major bills.

Earlier in the day, the Senate approved a stopgap bill extending government funding until Dec. 16.

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiOnly four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Raskin embraces role as constitutional scholar Bottom Line MORE (D-Md.), a member of the Appropriations Committee, said negotiators are making progress on whittling down policy amendments.

"We were down to 42," she said. "I think we could squeeze it to 35."

The emerging timeline would give Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump orders more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions What if 2020 election is disputed? Immigration bills move forward amid political upheaval MORE (R-Ky.) less than a day to overcome the upper chamber’s procedural hurdles and hold a final vote. 

Senate leaders, however, are confident they’ll get their colleagues to sign off because many are eager to return home for the holidays.

McConnell on Wednesday morning hailed this congressional session as one of the most productive “in a long time.”

And the chamber’s presidential candidates, notably Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFrustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump GOP senators work to get Trump on board with new disaster aid package MORE (Fla.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOn The Money: Conservative blocks disaster relief bill | Trade high on agenda as Trump heads to Japan | Boeing reportedly faces SEC probe over 737 Max | Study finds CEO pay rising twice as fast as worker pay Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan MORE (Texas), don’t want to spend too much time away from battleground states.

"I think the effort is going to [be] to try to finish middle of next week," Hatch said. Asked if the Wednesday deadline gives the Senate enough time to get through its procedural hurdles, he said, "I think so. We may be dumb, but we're not as dumb as people think." 

Senate sources on Thursday said the chances of reaching a deal on a major tax deal were greater than 50 percent.

They say it would eliminate expiration dates for the research and development tax credit and the Section 179 small-business expensing deduction, as well as core tax breaks from President Obama’s 2009 fiscal stimulus plan. Those are the expansions of the child tax credit, the earned income tax credit and the American opportunity tax credit for college expenses.

Senate sources say the deal will also likely include a two-year moratorium of ObamaCare’s “Cadillac tax” on expensive insurance plans and the medical device tax. 

Jordain Carney contributed.