Whip Count: Senate and House budgets

Senate Democratic leaders are looking to minimize defections on their budget, put forward by Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayBuilding strong public health capacity across the US Texas abortion law creates 2022 headache for GOP Top Democrat says he'll push to address fossil fuel tax breaks in spending bill MORE (D-Wash.).

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In order to pass their first budget resolution in four years, Senate Democrats can only afford five defections — assuming all Republicans vote “no.”

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) has missed budget amendment votes this week due to illness. If he cannot make the final vote, the number of defections that Democrats could afford would drop to four. His office said Friday he is available to vote on the budget if he is needed.

These lists will be updated as members weigh in. Please email information to bcusack@thehill.com.

Last updated at 6:30 p.m. on March 22

Recent updates: Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinMajor climate program likely to be nixed from spending package: reports Sanders, Manchin escalate fight over .5T spending bill Sanders blames media for Americans not knowing details of Biden spending plan MORE (D-W.Va.)


SENATE DEMOCRATS

Firm No, Leaning No, Likely No (0)


Undecided, Declined to Answer, No Comment (6)

Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBiden nominates Nicholas Burns as ambassador to China Cryptocurrency industry lobbies Washington for 'regulatory clarity' Bottom line MORE (Mont.) — On Friday, the Senate Finance panel chairman said his vote on the budget has "yet to be determined." Baucus is up for reelection in 2014.

Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Alaska group backing independent candidate appears linked to Democrats Sullivan wins Alaska Senate GOP primary MORE (Alaska) — Begich is facing reelection next year.

Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyBiden to have audience with pope, attend G20 summit Biden taps former Indiana Sen. Donnelly as ambassador to Vatican Republicans may regret restricting reproductive rights MORE (Ind.) — Freshman member from a red state.

Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganInfighting grips Nevada Democrats ahead of midterms Democrats, GOP face crowded primaries as party leaders lose control Biden's gun control push poses danger for midterms MORE (N.C.) — Still reviewing as of Friday. Hagan is a GOP target in 2014.

Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampWashington's oldest contact sport: Lobbyists scrum to dilute or kill Democrats' tax bill Progressives prepare to launch counterattack in tax fight Business groups aim to divide Democrats on .5T spending bill MORE (N.D.) — As of Friday, Heitkamp was still reviewing the budget. Heitkamp is a freshman senator who stresses her independence.

Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorBottom line Everybody wants Joe Manchin Cotton glides to reelection in Arkansas MORE (Ark.) — "We'll see how it looks and how it's amended," Pryor told The Hill on Friday, later adding he has "all day to decide." Skated to reelection in 2008. 2014 may be different.


Yes or leaning yes (8)

Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinFCC needs to help services for the deaf catch up to videoconferencing tech Biden celebrates anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act Ex-Rep. Abby Finkenauer running for Senate in Iowa MORE (Iowa) — Retiring liberal senator is leaning "yes."

Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonCornell to launch new bipartisan publication led by former Rep. Steve Israel Trump faces tough path to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac overhaul Several hurt when truck runs into minimum wage protesters in Michigan MORE (S.D.) — Johnson, who is up for reelection, is backing the budget.

Angus KingAngus KingSenate to vote next week on Freedom to Vote Act GOP tries to take filibuster pressure off Manchin, Sinema Hillicon Valley — Presented by American Edge Project — TSA to issue cybersecurity directives to secure rail, aviation sectors MORE (Maine) — This independent who caucus with Democrats will vote "yes."

Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCassidy wins reelection in Louisiana Bottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth MORE (La.) — Landrieu will vote "yes." She praised the Murray budget as a strong rebuttal of the House budget, put forward by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanJuan Williams: Pelosi shows her power Cheney takes shot at Trump: 'I like Republican presidents who win re-election' Cheney allies flock to her defense against Trump challenge MORE (R-Wis.), adding, "the Senate and the House will have a very stark choice between the two." Republicans are targeting Landrieu in 2014.

Joe Manchin (W.Va.) — Manchin's vote Thursday night to recommit the budget raised questions about his final vote, but he indicated support on Friday, saying: "We're very open-minded toward it. We need a vehicle."

Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillEx-Rep. Akin dies at 74 Republicans may regret restricting reproductive rights Sunday shows preview: States deal with fallout of Ida; Texas abortion law takes effect MORE (Mo.) — Leaning "yes," saying, "I think it's certainly better than hocus pocus, which is kind of what the Ryan budget is."

Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders, Manchin escalate fight over .5T spending bill Sanders blames media for Americans not knowing details of Biden spending plan Briahna Joy Gray: Proposals favored by Black voters 'first at the chopping block' in spending talks MORE (Vt.) — An independent who caucuses with Democrats, Sanders said he would support the budget even though he'd prefer higher tax hikes.

Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterSenate to vote next week on Freedom to Vote Act Democrats struggle to gain steam on Biden spending plan The Hill's 12:30 Report: Debt ceiling fight punted to December MORE (Mont.) — Tester told The Hill on March 21 he would be a "yes" vote. 


HOUSE REPUBLICANS

The House on March 21 approved Rep. Paul Ryan's (R-Wis.) budget, with 10 Republicans voting against it.

Here are the 10 no votes:

Justin AmashJustin AmashDemocrats defend Afghan withdrawal amid Taliban advance Vietnam shadow hangs over Biden decision on Afghanistan Kamala Harris and our shameless politics MORE (Mich.) — On March 19, Amash said, "It basically follows the same structure as the previous budget, which I voted 'no' on."

Rep. Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounHundreds apply to fill Isakson's Senate seat in Georgia Joe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia California lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment MORE (Ga.) — Senate candidate in Georgia. Broun, who has previously backed Ryan budgets, said in a release, "Instead of enacting real spending cuts or taking steps to curb our fiscal irresponsibility, Chairman Ryan's proposal in fact encourages spending growth ... I'm positive that there is indeed a 'Path to Prosperity,' but Chairman Ryan's budget certainly isn't it."

Rep. Rick CrawfordRick CrawfordArkansas legislature splits Little Rock in move that guarantees GOP seats Gas shortages spread to more states Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he MORE (R-Ark.) — Cites ObamaCare for his no vote.

Rep. Randy ForbesJames (Randy) Randy ForbesDaschle Group hires first GOP lobbyist Overnight Defense: US sanctions NATO ally Turkey over Russian defense system | Veterans groups, top Democrats call for Wilkie's resignation | Gingrich, other Trump loyalists named to Pentagon board Gingrich, other Trump loyalists named to Pentagon advisory panel MORE (R-Va.) — Forbes voted no because he believes "it fails to fund our military at an adequate level to provide for the common defense of our nation."

Chris Gibson (N.Y.) — Gibson is considered vulnerable next year. Voted against last year’s budget, saying defense spending must be reduced.

Phil GingreyJohn (Phil) Phillip GingreyEx-Tea Party lawmakers turn heads on K Street 2017's top health care stories, from ObamaCare to opioids Beating the drum on healthcare MORE (Ga.) — A possible Senate candidate in Georgia, Gingrey had been seen as a possible "yes" vote. Before the vote, he said: "I support conservative principles that spur job growth."

Joe Heck (Nev.) — Democrats highlighted Heck's support of the Ryan budget in the 2012 election. In a release, Heck suggested Ryan plan is anti-Nevada: "...when those proposals disproportionately affect our state, my vote indicates my priority and that priority is Nevada."

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Citing foreign aid, Jones said he would vote "no." Jones rejected Ryan's budgets in the last Congress.

Thomas Massie (Ky.) — In a release, Massie stated, "Paul Ryan's proposed House budget would increase government spending at nearly twice the rate of inflation. Our country is deep in debt, and it is irresponsible to increase spending at this rate."

David McKinleyDavid Bennett McKinleyTwo GOP incumbents vow to run in redrawn West Virginia district Investing in low-emissions energy is the key to the climate crisis OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court rules that pipeline can seize land from New Jersey | Study: EPA underestimated methane emissions from oil and gas development | Kevin McCarthy sets up task forces on climate, other issues MORE (W.Va.) — Cited a variety of reasons why he voted no, including cuts to the budget of the FBI and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which have offices in West Virginia. McKinely rejected Ryan budgets in 2011 and 2012.


— Noura Alfadi-Andreasson, Bernie Becker, Russell Berman, Bob Cusack, Zach DeRitis, Molly K. Hooper, Amrita Khalid, Alex Lazar, Taylor Seale, Mario Trujillo and Erik Wasson contributed.