Whip Count: Senate and House budgets

Senate Democratic leaders are looking to minimize defections on their budget, put forward by Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayTrump officials seek to reassure public about safety of a potential coronavirus vaccine Overnight Health Care: Trump refuses to say if he slowed down coronavirus testing | US COVID-19 cases rise, marking ugly contrast with Europe | Trump health officials to testify on continued dangers of coronavirus pandemic The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Mark Takano says Congress must extend worker benefits expiring in July; WHO reports record spike in global cases MORE (D-Wash.).

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In order to pass their first budget resolution in four years, Senate Democrats can only afford five defections — assuming all Republicans vote “no.”

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) has missed budget amendment votes this week due to illness. If he cannot make the final vote, the number of defections that Democrats could afford would drop to four. His office said Friday he is available to vote on the budget if he is needed.

These lists will be updated as members weigh in. Please email information to bcusack@thehill.com.

Last updated at 6:30 p.m. on March 22

Recent updates: Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog accuses Commerce of holding up 'Sharpiegate' report | Climate change erases millennia of cooling: study | Senate nixes proposal limiting Energy Department's control on nuclear agency budget Senate nixes proposal limiting Energy Department's control on nuclear agency budget McConnell on filibuster talk: Democrats want to 'vandalize' Senate rules MORE (D-W.Va.)


SENATE DEMOCRATS

Firm No, Leaning No, Likely No (0)


Undecided, Declined to Answer, No Comment (6)

Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBottom line Bottom line The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation MORE (Mont.) — On Friday, the Senate Finance panel chairman said his vote on the budget has "yet to be determined." Baucus is up for reelection in 2014.

Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (Alaska) — Begich is facing reelection next year.

Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEx-Sen. Joe Donnelly endorses Biden Lobbying world 70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents MORE (Ind.) — Freshman member from a red state.

Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganThe Hill's Campaign Report: North Carolina emerges as key battleground for Senate control Tillis wins North Carolina Senate primary Coronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 MORE (N.C.) — Still reviewing as of Friday. Hagan is a GOP target in 2014.

Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn Heitkamp70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents Susan Collins set to play pivotal role in impeachment drama Pro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA MORE (N.D.) — As of Friday, Heitkamp was still reviewing the budget. Heitkamp is a freshman senator who stresses her independence.

Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 MORE (Ark.) — "We'll see how it looks and how it's amended," Pryor told The Hill on Friday, later adding he has "all day to decide." Skated to reelection in 2008. 2014 may be different.


Yes or leaning yes (8)

Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinErnst challenges Greenfield to six debates in Iowa Senate race Biden unveils disability rights plan: 'Your voices must be heard' Bottom line MORE (Iowa) — Retiring liberal senator is leaning "yes."

Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonCornell to launch new bipartisan publication led by former Rep. Steve Israel Trump faces tough path to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac overhaul Several hurt when truck runs into minimum wage protesters in Michigan MORE (S.D.) — Johnson, who is up for reelection, is backing the budget.

Angus KingAngus KingMcConnell on filibuster talk: Democrats want to 'vandalize' Senate rules Manchin draws line against repealing legislative filibuster Filibuster reform gains steam with Democrats MORE (Maine) — This independent who caucus with Democrats will vote "yes."

Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuBottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth Congress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face MORE (La.) — Landrieu will vote "yes." She praised the Murray budget as a strong rebuttal of the House budget, put forward by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanBush, Romney won't support Trump reelection: NYT Twitter joins Democrats to boost mail-in voting — here's why Lobbying world MORE (R-Wis.), adding, "the Senate and the House will have a very stark choice between the two." Republicans are targeting Landrieu in 2014.

Joe Manchin (W.Va.) — Manchin's vote Thursday night to recommit the budget raised questions about his final vote, but he indicated support on Friday, saying: "We're very open-minded toward it. We need a vehicle."

Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillTrump mocked for low attendance at rally Missouri county issues travel advisory for Lake of the Ozarks after Memorial Day parties Senate faces protracted floor fight over judges amid pandemic safety concerns MORE (Mo.) — Leaning "yes," saying, "I think it's certainly better than hocus pocus, which is kind of what the Ryan budget is."

Bernie SandersBernie SandersOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog accuses Commerce of holding up 'Sharpiegate' report | Climate change erases millennia of cooling: study | Senate nixes proposal limiting Energy Department's control on nuclear agency budget Sanders calls for social distancing, masks and disinfection on planes as flights operate at full capacity Nina Turner addresses Biden's search for a running mate MORE (Vt.) — An independent who caucuses with Democrats, Sanders said he would support the budget even though he'd prefer higher tax hikes.

Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterBipartisan Senate group offers bill to strengthen watchdog law after Trump firings Senate confirms Trump's watchdog for coronavirus funds Montana barrels toward blockbuster Senate fight MORE (Mont.) — Tester told The Hill on March 21 he would be a "yes" vote. 


HOUSE REPUBLICANS

The House on March 21 approved Rep. Paul Ryan's (R-Wis.) budget, with 10 Republicans voting against it.

Here are the 10 no votes:

Justin AmashJustin AmashMichigan candidate's daughter urges people not to vote for him in viral tweet Can Trump break his 46 percent ceiling? NFL to close offices for Juneteenth, making it an official league holiday MORE (Mich.) — On March 19, Amash said, "It basically follows the same structure as the previous budget, which I voted 'no' on."

Rep. Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounHundreds apply to fill Isakson's Senate seat in Georgia Joe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia California lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment MORE (Ga.) — Senate candidate in Georgia. Broun, who has previously backed Ryan budgets, said in a release, "Instead of enacting real spending cuts or taking steps to curb our fiscal irresponsibility, Chairman Ryan's proposal in fact encourages spending growth ... I'm positive that there is indeed a 'Path to Prosperity,' but Chairman Ryan's budget certainly isn't it."

Rep. Rick CrawfordRick CrawfordRepublicans score procedural victory on Democrats' infrastructure bill The case for renewed US engagement in Latin America Arkansas program that places unemployed guards, reservists in agriculture jobs can be a model for nation MORE (R-Ark.) — Cites ObamaCare for his no vote.

Rep. Randy ForbesJames (Randy) Randy ForbesBottom line Selection of Sarah Makin-Acciani shows the commitment to religious liberty Too much ‘can do,’ not enough candor MORE (R-Va.) — Forbes voted no because he believes "it fails to fund our military at an adequate level to provide for the common defense of our nation."

Chris Gibson (N.Y.) — Gibson is considered vulnerable next year. Voted against last year’s budget, saying defense spending must be reduced.

Phil GingreyJohn (Phil) Phillip GingreyEx-Tea Party lawmakers turn heads on K Street 2017's top health care stories, from ObamaCare to opioids Beating the drum on healthcare MORE (Ga.) — A possible Senate candidate in Georgia, Gingrey had been seen as a possible "yes" vote. Before the vote, he said: "I support conservative principles that spur job growth."

Joe Heck (Nev.) — Democrats highlighted Heck's support of the Ryan budget in the 2012 election. In a release, Heck suggested Ryan plan is anti-Nevada: "...when those proposals disproportionately affect our state, my vote indicates my priority and that priority is Nevada."

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Citing foreign aid, Jones said he would vote "no." Jones rejected Ryan's budgets in the last Congress.

Thomas Massie (Ky.) — In a release, Massie stated, "Paul Ryan's proposed House budget would increase government spending at nearly twice the rate of inflation. Our country is deep in debt, and it is irresponsible to increase spending at this rate."

David McKinleyDavid Bennett McKinleyMLB, Congress play hardball in fight over minor leagues Koch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill 'Minor league cities' need new federal partnership MORE (W.Va.) — Cited a variety of reasons why he voted no, including cuts to the budget of the FBI and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which have offices in West Virginia. McKinely rejected Ryan budgets in 2011 and 2012.


— Noura Alfadi-Andreasson, Bernie Becker, Russell Berman, Bob Cusack, Zach DeRitis, Molly K. Hooper, Amrita Khalid, Alex Lazar, Taylor Seale, Mario Trujillo and Erik Wasson contributed.